Media statements

Media statements (442)

Flatback hatchling making its first trip to the ocean

Cable Beach community turtle monitoring with the Yawuru Rangers

It is the nesting season for flatback turtles and local residents are encouraged to participate in the Cable Beach community turtle monitoring program, coordinated by the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) and the Yawuru joint management team. Monitoring begins in early November and runs throughout the turtle nesting period, which coincides with the Yawuru seasons ‘laja’ and ‘man-gala’’, said Yawuru program leader Sharon Ferguson. “As part of the monitoring, staff and volunteers conduct early morning walks along sections of Cable Beach and identify, record and report on nesting activity,” Ms Ferguson said. “Flatback turtles (Natator depressus) are the main species to use Cable Beach as a nesting site and many people may be unaware that we are lucky enough to have turtles nesting on…

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A whale breaches as a boat strays too close

Watch whales safely at Ngari Capes Marine Park

With the whale watching season in full swing, boaters are being reminded to maintain a safe distance from these mighty creatures as they migrate south. Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) officer Pia Courtis said the Ngari Capes Marine Park between Busselton and Augusta was a prime venue to spot humpback and southern right whales and calves returning from the State’s far north to feeding areas in Antarctic waters. “In southern Western Australia this is a fantastic time of year to enjoy whale watching and we just ask that people follow some simple guidelines when they’re out on the water,” Ms Courtis said. “The most important thing is not to approach within 100m of a whale – this is for the safety of people onboard…

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DPaW wildlife staff Karen Smith, Rick Dawson and Kevin Morrison with the bobtails

Thirty lizards seized at Perth International Airport

  Two Japanese men have been charged with attempting to smuggle 30 lizards out of Australia. Australian Customs and Border Protection Service (ACBPS) officers selected the 38-year-old and 33-year-old's baggage for examination when they checked in to the Perth International Airport. During an x-ray of the baggage, ACBPS officers noticed irregularities which appeared to be lizards. ACBPS officers and WA Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) officers further examined the men's baggage and found 28 shingleback lizards, one dragon and one skink. ACBPS Director Airport Operations Perth, Jan Hill, congratulated the officers for their continued work in preventing the illegal import and export of Australia's unique native wildlife. “We take protecting Australia's native species seriously and will not tolerate the exporting of our protected wildlife.…

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Help save sea turtles washed up on beaches

Help save sea turtles washed up on beaches

Beach visitors in Perth and the south-west are being asked to keep an eye out for stranded sea turtles. Regional wildlife officer Cam Craigie, from the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW), said anyone finding a turtle washed up on a beach should immediately call the Wildcare Helpline on 9474 9055. “These turtles are often very small loggerhead hatchlings, about 10cm in length, which have been brought south from tropical regions on the strong Leeuwin current,” Mr Craigie said. “Storms can often cause turtles to become tired, resulting in them being caught in seaweed and ending up on our beaches.” Mr Craigie said in cold southern waters turtles could be affected by “cold water stunning”, which can leave the animals susceptible to bacteria and parasitic…

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Websites and app assist with cane toad identification

Websites and app assist with cane toad identification

Spotted a cane toad or native frog? The Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) is encouraging people to use their mobile device or computer to check the difference. DPaW State Cane Toad Initiative program coordinator Corrin Everitt said if a suspected cane toad was discovered, members of the public could easily access online information and photographs to help with identification. “The department’s website www.dpaw.wa.gov.au has a section devoted to cane toads, native frog identification pictures and handy contacts,” Ms Everitt said. “The cane toad app in the iTunes store allows those with mobile devices are able to check identification features of seven native Kimberley frogs, along with cane toads in three stages of the life cycle. “Another good resource is the Western Australian Museum’s Alcoa…

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