Media statements

Media statements (415)

Karara Rangelands boasts a brilliant wildflower display

Karara Rangelands boasts a brilliant wildflower display

Spring is just around the corner and now is the time for people to start planning their outback adventures through swathes of colourful wildflowers under a big blue Murchison sky. Karara Rangeland Park is renowned for its wildflowers that carpet the land after winter rainfall and this year is set to be the best wildflower display Western Australia’s Midwest region has seen. Parks and visitor services regional leader Sue Hancock recommends Karara Rangeland Park as the perfect location to camp under the stars with or without facilities or sleep indoors at the Thundelarra Shearers’ Quarters or nearby station stays. “The 560,000 hectare park features a range of diverse landscapes, Aboriginal heritage and a rich pastoral and mining history. Its landscapes and habitats include York gum…

Read more...

Environment Minister Stephen Dawson at the Community Rivercare Program launch in 2017

Community Rivercare Program grants now open

A total of $900,000 will be allocated to community groups over three years Funding is administered by the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions Round two of the Community Rivercare Program is now open and applications are invited from not-for-profit volunteer groups until September 17, 2018. Funding is available to improve habitat for birds, fish and other animals dependent on waterways, improve water quality, and address foreshore erosion in the Swan Canning Catchment. In the first round of funding, 17 community groups were awarded more than $540,000 for projects ranging from one to three years in duration. Grant projects which received funding in round one included: Ellen Brook endangered native fish habitat enhancement; Bannister Creek and Canning River Regional Park boundary enhancement; Bardon Park environmental…

Read more...

The six Parks and Wildlife staff heading to the USA. Photo- DBCA

WA firefighters deployed to assist with USA blazes

Six Parks and Wildlife Service firefighters from the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) have departed to the United States of America to help battle multiple large fires that have been burning across the north-west of the nation. Luke Bentley, Peter Bamess, John Fishwick, Tim Hutton, Leigh Sage and Beverly Gardiner will be part of a 180-strong Australian and New Zealand contingent sent to assist with fire control. The officers are highly skilled and experienced in a variety of incident management roles including planning, logistics and operations. The deployment has been facilitated through an agreement between the US National Multi-Agency Coordination Group and the Australian National Interagency Fire Centre, with resources being managed via the National Resource Sharing Centre and Emergency Management Victoria.

Read more...

New island home for south coast endangered species

New island home for south coast endangered species

Two remote islands in the Recherche Archipelago, east of Esperance, could provide a lifeline for two of Western Australia's most endangered species, the noisy scrub-bird and Gilbert's potoroo. Five noisy scrub-birds were translocated from Bald Island, near Albany, to Mondrain Island, as part of a trial to determine the island's suitability as a new home for the species. Six Gilbert's potoroos from Bald Island were released onto Middle Island, following two successful trial translocations that showed the island could support the species, particularly because it had a good supply of truffles which potoroos feed on. The Gilbert's potoroo is the world's rarest marsupial, with fewer than 100 animals in existence in Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve and newly established populations at Bald Island and Waychinicup…

Read more...

Native rodent trapped for the first time in WA in 36 years

Native rodent trapped for the first time in WA in 36 years

The elusive black-footed tree-rat has been trapped in the remote North-West Kimberley for the first time since 1982.   The black-footed tree-rat is a large tree dwelling rodent with distinctive black feet and a long black and white tail.   Weighing up to 850 grams, it is one of Australia's largest rodents and was rediscovered in the Kimberley after photographic evidence confirmed its existence last year.   It was the first time the species, which is endemic to Australia, had been seen in the Kimberley for more than 30 years, despite considerable survey efforts over those years.

Read more...