Media statements

Media statements (450)

Seaweed and seagrass is important for river health. Photo: Parks and Wildlife

Seagrass and seaweed to build up on Swan River foreshore

As summer approaches, Parks and Wildlife is advising people that seaweed and seagrass may build up on the Swan River foreshore and is important for the ecological health of the river. Department of Parks and Wildlife river systems manager Mark Cugley said marine plants played an important role within the river system as habitat for fish and sea horses and as a food source for black swans. “Seaweed and seagrass in the Swan River can grow rapidly due to increases in temperature, light and nutrient levels and then, as it dies off, prevailing winds and tides can cause it to accumulate on some foreshores of the Swan Canning Riverpark,” he said. Edith Cowan University Associate Professor Glenn Hyndes said the university was partnering with Parks…

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Be on lookout for Cable Beach turtle nests

Be on lookout for Cable Beach turtle nests

People are being urged to be aware of nesting flatback turtles on the world famous Cable Beach in Broome over the next few months. Department of Parks and Wildlife Yawuru Coastal Parks coordinator Luke Puertollano said highly visible signage was being trialled this year to help avoid damage to nests. “Between now and March, we will have dozens of signs in place where Cable Beach Community Turtle Monitoring program volunteers have identified turtle nests along a 6km stretch of the beach,” he said. “This will help people avoid nests, which are generally from the high tide mark up to the sand dune area, and it will also help build awareness with visitors that Cable Beach is an important turtle nesting site.” Mr Puertollano said 3km…

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Fish being surveyed in the Swan Canning Riverpark

River oxygenation helps fish thrive

A black bream tracking project in the Swan and Canning rivers is showing benefits of the Liberal National Government's investment in providing artificial oxygenation in the upper reaches of the rivers. Environment Minister Albert Jacob said the tracking of 55 tagged black bream had found they avoided areas of the rivers that had low oxygen levels, confirming river oxygenation was an important strategy for improving river water quality and survival of aquatic species. "This research is showing that black bream, a popular recreational fishing species, favour areas of the river that are well oxygenated, which suggests that artificial oxygenation is beneficial during periods of low oxygen, particularly during summer and autumn months," Mr Jacob said. "This is important because improving water quality with oxygenation relief…

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South-west reptiles emerge with warmer weather

South-west reptiles emerge with warmer weather

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding people in the south-west to be aware that reptile activity is on the rise with warmer spring weather. Parks and Wildlife south-west nature conservation officer Cassie Eikelboom said reptile encounters would increase as they emerged to bask in the sun, mate and search for food. “Snakes and lizards are most active over the next few months and we are experiencing a sharp rise in the number of calls from concerned residents who come across a snake or lizard,” she said. “The department recommends people take extra care when venturing outdoors, particularly near swamps, lakes and bushland and do not approach or aggravate snakes in any way. “Snakes are an integral part of the natural environment and play…

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Turtle monitoring taskforce descends on Pilbara island

Turtle monitoring taskforce descends on Pilbara island

A Department of Parks and Wildlife pilot flatback turtle monitoring program is underway at Thevenard Island, 22km off the coast of Onslow, to investigate its suitability as a long-term monitoring site. Over the next four weeks a team led by Parks and Wildlife marine scientists and assisted by volunteers will be collecting data, counting turtle tracks and tagging female turtles. Thevenard Island project leader Sabrina Fossette-Halot said the team’s objective was to assess the size of the flatback turtle population nesting on Thevenard Island and to deploy satellite tags to track female turtles’ movements during and after the nesting season. “We have about 20 volunteers from Onslow, Exmouth, Perth and even Queensland who are assisting Parks and Wildlife staff in collecting data,” Dr Fossette-Halot said.…

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