Notification: Parks and Wildlife Service is part of the new Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA).

Media statements

Media statements (363)

Birdlife Australia

Threatened bird species nesting on Point Walter Spit

Recreation river users and fishers are being asked to please avoid the Point Walter Spit as there are presently an estimated 60 breeding pairs of fairy Terns making use of the vegetation and shoreline at the end of the spit. The City of Melville has erected signage discouraging access to the site. It is estimated that there are less than 1600 breeding pairs of fairy terns left in Western Australia. These tiny birds nest between October and January and like many shorebirds will nest above the high-tide mark on sandy beaches, where they lay one or two specked eggs in a shallow scrape in the sand. The eggs and chicks are highly vulnerable to disturbance as well as predators. Other birds, including pied oyster catchers…

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Warmer weather brings smelly weeds to Swan River foreshore

Warmer weather brings smelly weeds to Swan River foreshore

As summer approaches, the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions is reminding people that seagrass and macroalgae often accumulates on shorelines at this time of year and may emit odours as part of a natural breakdown process. DBCA Rivers and Estuaries Director Mark Cugley said submerged vegetation played an important role within the river system as habitat for fish and sea horses and as a food source for black swans. “Macroalgae and seagrass in the Swan River can grow rapidly at this time of year due to increases in temperature, available light and nutrients and then, as it dies off, prevailing winds and tides can cause it to accumulate as wrack on some foreshores of the Swan Canning Riverpark,” Mr Cugley said. “While the accumulated…

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Replacement of historic pedestrian bridge

Replacement of historic pedestrian bridge

A new page has been added to the history of the Bibbulmun Track with the opening of a new suspension bridge to replace the iconic Long Gully Bridge, destroyed in the 2015 Boddington bushfire. The new state-of-the-art bridge, built 12 kilometres downstream of the old bridge site in Lane Poole Reserve, has been named Bilya Djena Bidi, Aboriginal for a '(swinging) river foot bridge'. The locally designed and built bridge spans 82 metres and includes two 12-metre towers that hold the bridge above the 100-year predicted flood level, enabling Bibbulmun Track walkers to safely cross the Murray River. The $850,000 project was funded by the State Government, Bibbulmun Track Foundation, and Alcoa Australia, with support from engineering company BG&E Pty Ltd who developed the concept…

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Swan Canning Riverpark to benefit from funded volunteer projects

Swan Canning Riverpark to benefit from funded volunteer projects

​$900,000 grants scheme for restoration projects along the Swan and Canning rivers Community volunteer groups to help improve water quality and conservation of wildlife The health and amenity of the Swan and Canning rivers will be improved with a new grants scheme that recognises the important work undertaken by volunteer community groups along river foreshores. The McGowan Labor Government is investing $900,000 over three years in the Community Rivercare Program, which will engage community support and involvement for various projects to protect and enhance recreation areas around the rivers. The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions is seeking expressions of interest to deliver projects including foreshore restoration and riverbank erosion, reduction of nutrient inflows, native waterbird conservation, native fish habitat protection and restocking of native…

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Be Crocwise safety campaign launched

Be Crocwise safety campaign launched

Residents and visitors to the Kimberley are being encouraged to Be Crocwise this summer, following a spike in saltwater crocodile numbers and sightings across the region. Be Crocwise – a new safety campaign educating people to be safe in and around Kimberley waters – has been adopted from the Northern Territory, creating consistent messaging across the top end of Australia. Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) Parks and Wildlife Service Kimberley regional manager Daryl Moncrieff said it was important for people to be aware of the risks associated with proximity to crocodiles. “It appears not only the number but also the size of the individual animals is increasing so it is a timely reminder about the presence of crocodiles in the Kimberley and to…

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