Media statements

Media statements (440)

Noisy scrub bird. Photo- Alan Danks

New island home for south coast endangered species

Two remote islands in the Recherche Archipelago, east of Esperance, could provide a lifeline for two of Western Australia's most endangered species, the noisy scrub-bird and Gilbert's potoroo. Five noisy scrub-birds were translocated from Bald Island, near Albany, to Mondrain Island, as part of a trial to determine the island's suitability as a new home for the species. Six Gilbert's potoroos from Bald Island were released onto Middle Island, following two successful trial translocations that showed the island could support the species, particularly because it had a good supply of truffles which potoroos feed on. The Gilbert's potoroo is the world's rarest marsupial, with fewer than 100 animals in existence in Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve and newly established populations at Bald Island and Waychinicup…

Read more...

Western ringtail possum

Ringtail possums poisoned in the South West

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) is urging South West residents to think twice before using rat baits in their roofs. Several critically endangered western ringtail possums have been unintentionally poisoned with rat baits over the past few months. DBCA Parks and Wildlife Service regional wildlife officer Pia Courtis is encouraging residents to take a closer look at any droppings left behind by animals before using baits. “Rats, mice and possums often live in roof cavities, especially in winter when they are looking for dry and warm shelter,” Ms Courtis said. “Some reptiles and other native mammals, such as goannas and phascogales, also make scratching and chewing noises and can be found in roof spaces. “Prior to undertaking any damage prevention or control…

Read more...

Deceased dugong removed from Exmouth's Town Beach in early June. Necropsy results show that the dugong died due to catastrophic blunt force trauma to the skull, caused by a small watercraft.

Look out for marine wildlife

Parks and Wildlife Service are encouraging people to be cautious when operating powered watercraft around marine animals following the recent death of a lactating female dugong due to a vessel strike in the Exmouth Gulf. Parks and Wildlife staff removed the dead dugong from Exmouth Town Beach in early June. Necropsy results show that the dugong died due to catastrophic blunt force trauma to the skull, caused by a small watercraft. Wildlife officer Peter Carstairs said the necropsy was undertaken by veterinarians in cooperation with a PHD marine scientist from Murdoch University. “People need to be extremely careful when recreating in our marine environment. We have a very high abundance of marine animals that inhabit and frequent the waters of the Ningaloo Coast, particularly going…

Read more...

New hope for the Gilbert’s potoroo

New hope for the Gilbert’s potoroo

The critically endangered Gilbert's potoroo has been given another reprieve from extinction, following promising results from two trial translocations to Middle Island, east of Esperance. The trials were carried out to assess the suitability of the island for the establishment of a new population. The species was believed to be extinct until it was rediscovered in 1994 at Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve, near Albany. In the following years, new populations were set up close by on Bald Island and in a fenced enclosure in Waychinicup National Park. In 2015, however, a lightning strike sparked a 1,230 hectare fire at Two Peoples Bay, destroying 90 per cent of the potoroo's habitat at that location. Following the fire, the then Department of Parks and Wildlife moved…

Read more...

Technology breakthrough for whale disentanglements

Technology breakthrough for whale disentanglements

Western Australian government scientists have partnered with marine wildlife experts to develop a new whale rescue tool that tracks the real-time location of whales entangled in fishing gear. The technology allows responders from the Parks and Wildlife Service at the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions to remotely monitor the whale before safely attempting a disentanglement. A total of 10 trackable buoys have been provided to specialist whale disentanglement teams at strategic locations between Esperance and Broome, including three in Perth. The technology was developed by Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development scientists, with $73,000 in funding from the Australian Department of the Environment and Energy. The Western Rock Lobster Council has provided $20,000 for the purchase of the 10 buoys. Comments attributed to…

Read more...