Media statements

Media statements (429)

Crocodile sighting in Dampier Creek

Crocodile sighting in Dampier Creek

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions is monitoring the Broome area following a sighting of an estuarine (saltwater) crocodile. Parks and Wildlife Service officer Peter Carstairs said a 2.5m crocodile was spotted at Dampier Creek during a night spotlighting patrol last week. “We are conducting patrols during the day and night and monitoring the Broome Crocodile Risk Mitigation Area around Cable Beach and Roebuck Bay,” he said.“If the animal is sighted it can be removed using non-lethal skin harpoon or a cage trap. “We are urging members of the public to remain vigilant around waterways where crocodiles are known to occur – we cannot guarantee any area in the Kimberley is crocodile-free.”Mr Carstairs said it was important to report all suspected crocodile sightings to…

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Willy wagtail with chicks

Wildlife springs to life

Now that spring has sprung, Western Australia’s native wildlife is on the move, many with new offspring. With animal activity on the increase, the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions is reminding people to be on the lookout for swooping magpies, snakes and baby wildlife such as chicks and ducklings. Wildlife officer Karen Smith said the warmer spring weather was usually when magpies became more territorial. “Swooping magpies can sometimes be intimidating but they often swoop to protect their eggs or chicks from any potential threats,” she said. “It’s recommended people avoid the site where magpies are known to swoop and try not to provoke or harass the bird, however if moving through the area is unavoidable, wear a broad-brimmed hat and carry an umbrella.…

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Investing in our environment

State Budget delivers environmental commitments

The State Government has announced key environmental commitments in the 2017-18 Budget including the establishment of a $20 million Aboriginal Ranger program focused on training, jobs and community development initiatives that deliver environmental outcomes. Aboriginal rangers will be trained and employed to undertake land and sea management, including tourism operations and protection of cultural and biodiversity values across a range of tenures in remote and regional Western Australia. To be delivered over five years, funding of $4 million is available in 2017-18. More information is available at www.dbca.wa.gov.au/aboriginalrangerprogram

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Swan Alcoa Landcare Program wins Landcare Award

Swan Alcoa Landcare Program wins Landcare Award

The success of community partnerships in delivering environmental outcomes for the Swan and Canning rivers has been recognised with the Swan Alcoa Landcare Program (SALP) winning the Australian Government Partnership category at the WA Landcare awards last night. Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) Director General Mark Webb said SALP was an excellent example of how industry, government and community were working together to improve local environments along Perth’s iconic river system. “For 19 years SALP has been providing urban community groups with a simple process to access funding for a wide range of landcare activities throughout the Swan and Canning catchments,” he said. “Projects it has supported range from invasive weed control, feral bee removal and dieback management to improving water quality in…

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Pilbara fox baiting program to protect native animals

Pilbara fox baiting program to protect native animals

Native wildlife recovery on the Burrup Peninsula and Dampier Archipelago is to be given a boost with a fox baiting program planned for the area in October. The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) Parks and Wildlife Service and the Murujuga Ranger Team will bait in Murujuga National Park, Dolphin Island, Angel Island and Gidley Island as part of the Western Shield fauna recovery program. Parks and Wildlife Service Pilbara nature conservation leader Coral Rowston said dried meat baits containing 1080 poison would be dispersed by aircraft, with further ground baiting throughout the year. “This baiting will help us to protect native species that are susceptible to predation by foxes, including the Rothschild’s rock wallaby, the threatened northern quoll and four species of marine…

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