Notification: Parks and Wildlife Service is part of the new Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA).

12 new Aboriginal ranger jobs in WA's South-West

Photo- DBCA
Photo- DBCA
  • McGowan Government delivers real jobs in the regions
  • 12 new ranger trainees employed as part of South West Aboriginal Land and Sea Council project 

The McGowan Labor Government has today announced is it progressing with the recruitment of 12 Aboriginal ranger positions in the State's South-West under the Aboriginal Ranger Program.

The new positions are part of the South West Aboriginal Land and Sea Council's Noongar Boodja Mentored Employment and Training Partnership project delivered by the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA).

The project will employ 12 Noongar trainee rangers on 16-month mentored training placements with DBCA.  One male and one female Noongar ranger will be directly employed and trained by the department to undertake work on conservation reserves in each of the six South West Native Title Agreement Areas.

Throughout the 16-month program, participants will be given the opportunity to undertake qualifications for Certificate II in Conservation and Land Management and DBCA's Fire Fighting Crew Member Course.

The project will increase capacity in the Noongar community to undertake conservation and land management activities on lands that will come across to Noongar ownership and control, as part of the South West Native Title Agreement.

It will also increase capacity to undertake joint management of the conservation estate in Noongar Boodja once the agreement is implemented.

Comments attributed to Environment Minister Stephen Dawson:

"The employment and training of Aboriginal rangers is a key priority for the McGowan Labor Government.

"Since coming into Government, we have rapidly progressed the $20 million Aboriginal Ranger Program to deliver on-ground action to support new and existing ranger groups throughout the State.

"Around $8.5 million in funding has been provided to 13 groups under round one of the program, providing real jobs and economic and social benefits.

"The employment of Aboriginal rangers will provide mentoring and training in conservation works such as biodiversity monitoring and research, management of tourism and cultural sites, weeds and feral animals, prescribed burning, bushfire suppression and environmental protection works."

 

Last modified on Thursday, 19 April 2018 15:16