Article Index

What is a Priority orchid?

Volunteers only adopt Priority One, Two and Three species. Priority Four species do not require urgent monitoring and survey.

Priority One orchids are known from one or a few collections or sight records (generally less than five), all on lands not managed for conservation. These species may be comparatively well known from one or more localities but do not meet adequacy of survey requirements and appear to be under immediate threat from known threatening processes.

Priority Two orchids are known from one or a few collections or sight records (generally less than five), some of which are on lands not under imminent threat of habitat destruction or degradation, e.g. national parks and other conservation reserves. Species may be comparatively well known from one or more localities but do not meet adequacy of survey requirements and appear to be under threat from known threatening processes.

Priority Three orchids are known from collections or sight records from several localities not under imminent threat, or from few but widespread localities with either large population size or significant remaining areas of apparently suitable habitat, much of it not under imminent threat. Species may be comparatively well known from several localities but do not meet adequacy of survey requirements and known threatening processes exist that could affect them.

Priority Four orchids are rare species considered to have been adequately surveyed, or for which sufficient knowledge is available, and that are considered not currently threatened or in need of special protection, but could be if present circumstances change.