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Biodiversity Conservation Regulations licences

On 1 January 2019, the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 and Biodiversity Conservation Regulations 2018 replaced the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 and the Sandalwood Act 1929 and their associated regulations. The new licensing regime specifies licences for taking, disturbing, supplying, possessing, processing, dealing, importing and exporting activities in relation to flora and fauna. Transitional arrangements ensure that any current Wildlife Conservation Act or Regulations licences continue to be valid until they expire. When your existing licence expires, an application for renewal will be required.

 

 


Flora Licences

Native flora (including flowers, seeds, whole plants, timber and firewood) is protected in Western Australia.

For information about the licences required to take, supply, process and deal in native flora, see the  pdfFact Sheet - Flora and Native Timber324.78 KB.

The following table specifies the new licence types, and a brief outline for each.

Until the online application system is in place, application forms are available by clicking the relevant attachment in the table. For licence types with no attachment, please contact Wildlife Licensing Section on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (08) 9219 9836. For any other information please contact Wildlife Licensing Section.

Licence Description
pdfFlora taking (commercial purposes) Crown land licence176.70 KB Take and supply flora from Crown land for commercial purposes
pdfFlora taking (other purposes) Crown land licence181.63 KB Take flora from Crown land for non-commercial purposes (ie. research, education, art and hobby, specimen lodgement)
pdfFlora taking (biological assessment) licence371.22 KB Take flora for inventory work (and obtain specimens for identification purposes) in the provision of environmental consulting services
pdfPrivate land supplier’s licence217.62 KB Supply (and possess for the purpose of supply) flora taken lawfully from private property
pdfCrown land supplier’s licence209.75 KB Supply (and possess for the purpose of supply) flora taken lawfully from Crown land
Flora dealing licence

Deal in flora

*Dealing exempt under Ministerial order but requirement to keep records for 2 years from date of purchase

Flora processing licence Process flora into carved wood, craft wood, wood chips, wood dust, oil, log timber and sawn timber and/or operate a processing establishment

Biological flora surveys

A person who takes flora for inventory work conducted in the provision of environmental consulting services and obtains specimens for identification purposes associated with this work can do so under a Flora taking (biological assessment) licence.

For more information on the licence requirements, see the pdfFact Sheet for Environment Consultants262.11 KB.


Sandalwood licences

The Biodiversity Conservation Regulations provide new licencing arrangements -for taking, transporting, supplying, processing, dealing and exporting sandalwood. These licences will be supported by sandalwood tracking forms that will accompany the sandalwood when it is transported from the place of harvest to the processor or dealer and between processors and dealers. These ensure that the legal origin of the sandalwood can be established during transaction, inspections or compliance procedures.

More information on how to apply for a licence to harvest sandalwood from private land can be found in the fact sheet  pdfFact Sheet - Private Land Sandalwood245.51 KB

The following table specifies the new licence types, and a brief outline for each.

Until the online application system is in place, application forms are available by clicking the relevant attachment in the table. For licence types with no attachment, please contact Wildlife Licensing Section on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (08) 9219 9836. For any other information please contact Wildlife Licensing Section.

Licence Description
Flora taking (sandalwood) licence Take sandalwood from private land- including cultivated/plantation sandalwood. Authorises preliminary processing in the field (ie. debarking) as well as the supply (sale) of sandalwood
Flora supplying (sandalwood) licence Supply (and possess for the purpose of supply) sandalwood taken lawfully from private property or Crown land
Flora dealing (sandalwood) licence Deal in (purchase and/or supply) sandalwood- including cultivated/plantation sandalwood
Flora processing (sandalwood) licence Processing sandalwood including cultivated/plantation sandalwood and/or operate a processing establishment
Flora exporting (sandalwood) licence Exporting flora from WA interstate (does not include direct export overseas – permit required from the Australian Government)

Fauna licences

Until the online application system is in place, application forms are available by clicking the relevant attachment in the table. For licence types with no attachment, please contact Wildlife Licensing Section on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (08) 9219 9831. For any other information please contact Wildlife Licensing Section.

Licence Description
pdfFauna taking (commercial products) licence182.51 KB Take and supply fauna (as fauna product) for commercial purposes
Fauna taking (commercial purposes) licence Take (as live fauna) and supply fauna for commercial purposes
Fauna taking (scientific or other purposes) licence Take fauna for non-commercial purposes including education, research, study and conservation
Fauna taking (dangerous fauna) licence Take dangerous fauna threatening public health or safety, stock or domesticated animals
Fauna taking (biological assessment) licence Take or disturb fauna for inventory work (and obtain specimens for identification purposes) in the provision of environmental consulting services
Fauna taking (relocation) licence Take or disturb fauna for the purpose of relocating
Fauna causing damage licence Take or disturb fauna causing an impact on public safety or biosecurity, or economic or biodiversity damage
Fauna disturbing (commercial interaction) licence Disturb fauna for commercial interaction purposes
Fauna disturbing (other purposes) licence Disturb fauna for non-commercial purposes including education, research study or conservation, or non-commercial tours
Fauna disturbing (feeding) licence Disturb fauna by feeding or luring fauna
Fauna possessing (display) licence

Possess fauna to display for conservation or education purposes

*Standard or advanced category dependent on species held.

Fauna possessing (breeding) licence Possess fauna for the purpose of breeding and supply
Fauna possessing (other purposes) licence Possess fauna for education, conservation study, conservation or rehabilitation purposes
pdfFauna possessing (pet keeper’s) licence258.22 KB

Possess fauna as a pet

*Standard or advanced category dependent on species held.

Fauna processing licence Process fauna and/or operate a processing establishment
Fauna dealing (general dealer’s) licence Deal in fauna (dead or alive)
Fauna dealing (pet dealer’s) licence

Deal in fauna to be kept as pets

*Standard or advanced category dependent on species held.

pdfFauna importing licence182.39 KB Import live fauna or fauna products
pdfFauna exporting licence178.57 KB Export live fauna or fauna products

Licences to keep reptiles, amphibians and birds as pets

In Western Australia, a licence is required to keep reptiles, amphibians and some species of birds as pets. For more information on the licence requirements, see the  pdfFact sheet -Aviculture and Herpetofauna266.21 KB.

 

Species of fauna that can be kept and under what category licence (Standard or Advanced) are listed in the pdfPet keeping and dealing list172.00 KB.

Licences are required to deal in reptiles, amphibians and birds for the pet industry. DBCA is not currently accepting applications for new herpetofauna taking licences (Fauna taking (commercial purposes) licence), however existing licensees can renew their licence under the new regime. DBCA is currently establishing a consultative committee to assist the department in the development of relevant policy and practice.

Licences for fauna rehabilitation

A sick, injured or abandoned native animal must be returned to the wild at the place where it was originally taken if it is capable of fending for itself; or given to a DBCA wildlife officer, a veterinary surgeon or a person who is authorised under a licence to rehabilitate fauna (i.e. the holder of a Fauna possessing (other purposes) licence). This must be done as soon as possible and within 72 hours of finding the sick, injured or abandoned animal.

If you find a sick, injured or abandoned animal and you require advice you should contact the Wildcare Helpline on 9474 9055.

For species listed as threatened or specially protected or penguins, notification must be given to DBCA within 24 hours of taking possession of the animal. This can be done by completing the docxInjured or Abandoned Fauna Notification Form54.93 KB and emailing it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

More information on how to apply for a licence can be found in the pdfFact Sheet -Wildlife Rehabilitation242.92 KB.

Licences to display fauna

New arrangements under the regulations ensure that native animals on display are contributing to conservation while ensuring their welfare needs are being met. More information on the licences required is in the fact sheet  pdfFact Sheet -Fauna Display282.74 KB .

Biological fauna surveys

A person who takes fauna for inventory work conducted in the provision of environmental consulting services and obtains specimens for identification purposes associated with this work can do so under a Fauna taking (biological assessment) licence.

For more information on the licence requirements, see the pdfFact Sheet for Environment Consultants262.11 KB.

Commercial kangaroo harvest

For more information on the licence requirements, follow this link pdfFact Sheet - Kangaroos harvest241.65 KB.

Managed fauna

There are some species of fauna that can be taken without a licence. For more information on these species, including maps of the areas in which managed fauna can be taken, follow this link :

(select to view maps below)



Bringing plants and animals into Western Australia

To protect our environment, many plants and animals cannot be brought into Western Australia, even from other Australian states.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) works together with the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions to protect our wildlife from commercial exploitation, and from the introduction of exotic pests, diseases and weeds into the state.

Information about the inspections that may be done at the State barrier is available in this document: State barrier animal inspection47.34 KB

If you illegally import animals or plants that are prohibited or restricted they can be seized, and penalties can apply. 

Import licences

A licence is required to import live native fauna and some fauna products into Western Australia. For more information, see the pdfCEO licensing guidelines for importing fauna332.42 KB.

A licence is also required to import exotic birds that are restricted species. For more information, see the section on restricted bird keeping and import permits.

Export licences

A licence is required to export some fauna products from Western Australia. For more information, see the pdfCEO licensing guidelines for exporting fauna233.57 KB.

Pet animals

The regulations provide for the issue of a licence to keep listed fauna species as pets in Western Australia.

There are no restrictions to bringing in pet cats, dogs and most domesticated animals from other states, although you will have to meet local council regulations, such as pet registration and microchipping and comply with any requirements for crossing the border.

Planning to bring in any pets from interstate into WA?
Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. well before your travel date.
Even if your bird, reptile or frog is licensed in your state, you still need check if it can be imported into and kept in Western Australia.

Plants

Western Australia remains relatively free of pests and diseases that adversely affect our agricultural industries and environment. Plants, bulbs, flowers, soil and potting mix can carry pests and diseases that pose a risk, including the possibility of becoming weeds themselves.

Planning to bring in any plants, seeds or bulbs?
Contact the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development well before your travel date.


Contact details

Contact us for further information on wildlife licensing.

Physical address: 
17 Dick Perry Avenue
Technology Park, Western Precinct
KENSINGTON WA 6151
Postal address: 
Wildlife Licensing Section
Locked Bag 30
Bentley Delivery Centre WA 6983
Australia

Telephone: +61 8 9219 9831
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Other licences and authorities

Restricted bird keeping and import permits

DBCA issues restricted keeping permits and import permits for restricted birds on behalf of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

Licence/AuthorityActivityInformation sheetsApplication form
Restricted keeping permit Keep exotic birds

pdfRestricted bird licence categories

pdfImporting and keeping introduced animals

pdfState barrier animal inspections

pdfRestricted keeping permit

docRestricted keeping permit

Beekeeping (apiary) licences

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) can grant apiary site permits and licences for the use of beehives on Crown lands. The department can also grant apiary authorities on land vested in the Conservation Commission, subject to consultation with the Commission and the approval of the Minister for Environment. Granting of licences and permits must be in accordance with a management plan for the area. The department also seeks the approval of other government agencies when applications are received for the placement of beehives on land not managed by the department.

Apiary authorities can be issued for a term of one year, three years, five years or seven years depending on the land tenure. Stringent environmental conditions ensure compliance with the department's management requirements, water catchment guidelines, dieback control, fire prevention and native vegetation clearing.

Apiary application forms and information

Commercial Operations Licences

Anyone operating a commercial business or offering educational services for private benefit (profit) in areas managed by DBCA will require a Commercial Operations Licence.

This not only includes tourism and recreational related products, but also services such as the supply of transport, information, instruction, supervision and the sale of goods Regulation 2).

Commercial operations licence application forms

Commercial filming lawful authority

Any photographer taking images or footage for commercial purposes on lands managed by the DBCA must obtain the department's permission. Non-commercial/private photography does not normally require lawful authority. 

Commercial filming permit forms