Media statements

Media statements (421)

WA mammal event draws scientists from across the world

WA mammal event draws scientists from across the world

More than 800 mammal scientists from 50 different countries will converge on Perth this week to learn and share knowledge at the 12th International Mammalogical Congress.   Scientists from government, university and the private sector will learn about Western Australia’s world-class reserves and the important conservation work carried out by the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions.   The congress will be held at the Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre from the 9th to the 14th of July.   The department’s Executive Director of Science and Conservation Dr Margaret Byrne said the scientific event, which is sponsored by the International Federation of Mammalogists, is targeted at mammal experts from around the world and held every four years.   “WA’s diverse native wildlife includes nearly 200…

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Master plan to guide WA mountain biking towards world stage

Master plan to guide WA mountain biking towards world stage

The push to transform Western Australia into an international mountain biking destination has received a boost with the release of a master plan to guide the development of trails in Perth and Peel. The Perth and Peel Mountain Bike Master Plan, launched today by Environment Minister Stephen Dawson and Sport and Recreation Minister Mick Murray, proposes expanding the current network of trails from 125 kilometres across nine sites to 575 kilometres across 24 sites. The report identifies priority sites of potential national significance in the Perth Hills, Wungong and Dwellingup; and regionally significant opportunities in the Swan Valley, Jarrahdale and Yanchep. The plan was developed by WestCycle, with support from the State Government, Lotterywest and the West Australian Mountain Bike Association. The plan can be…

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A message to our stakeholders

A message to our stakeholders

Parks and Wildlife Service is part of the new Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions. The new department brings together the functions and staff of the Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, Rottnest Island Authority, Zoological Parks Authority and the former Department of Parks and Wildlife. It has a strong emphasis on improving Western Australia’s natural attractions as key tourism assets, and creating opportunities for private sector investment and partnerships while conserving environmental values. It consolidates conservation science to build and share knowledge of the State’s biodiversity. Visit the Kings Park and Botanic Garden, Perth Zoo, and Rottnest Island websites.

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Rare skink populations discovered in Midwest

Rare skink populations discovered in Midwest

Two new populations of an endangered reptile have been discovered in the State’s Midwest, renewing hope for the long-term survival of the species. Five western spiny-tailed skinks (Egernia stokesii badia) were found sheltering in hollow logs at two different sites during a survey at Karara Rangeland Park, 50km east of Morawa. A distinct feature of spiny-tailed skinks is their long rough scales which are very prickly to touch. They can live for more than 10 years and can grow up to nearly 30cm. Department of Parks and Wildlife nature conservation regional leader Anthony Desmond said the survey was undertaken to assist with planning future recreational activities in the area. “Although they are known from this general area no survey has ever been done at this…

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Farmers boost biodiversity in Tarin Rock

Farmers boost biodiversity in Tarin Rock

Farmers have replanted 180ha of private property with native species at Tarin Rock in the southern Wheatbelt as part of a project to conserve biodiversity in the area. Parks and Wildlife Wheatbelt Region conservation officer Marissah Kruger said the Tarin Rock Priority Landscape Project had involved more than 60 conservation projects on private property over the past 15 years. “The Tarin Rock area, which covers 45,000ha, has a wide range of landscapes and remnant vegetation, including woodland, mallee and Kwongan heath, supporting a high diversity of native animals such as malleefowl, Carnaby’s cockatoos and red-tailed phascogales,” she said. “Local landholders have recognised these natural values, and have revegetated land with native species, while excluding stock to protect existing pockets of remnant vegetation. “To date, more…

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