Media statements

Media statements (421)

Funding for Aboriginal rangers delivered

Funding for Aboriginal rangers delivered

13 Aboriginal organisations share in $8.5 million in round one of the Aboriginal Ranger Program Projects to create about 85 new jobs and 80 training opportunities for Aboriginal rangers across Western Australia The McGowan Labor Government has announced the first round of recipients for its landmark $20 million, five-year Aboriginal Ranger Program. In Kalgoorlie to celebrate the awarding of funds, Environment Minister Stephen Dawson said the program was providing significant new jobs and training opportunities for Aboriginal people including 47 female Aboriginal ranger positions. The 13 recipient groups will employ rangers to undertake land and sea management including conservation, cultural, tourism and education activities across a range of tenures. The State Government will work with the successful recipients to finalise a funding agreement over the…

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Volunteers at the 2017 Clean Our Rivers event

Make a difference at riverside clean-up

You can make a difference to the health of the Swan Canning Riverpark by joining the Clean Our Rivers event from 29 January to 4 February. Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) volunteers and community manager Jason Menzies said anyone who had enjoyed a visit to the riverpark was encouraged to get involved. “People can gather their friends and take part in the riverside rubbish clean-up,” Mr Menzies said. “It’s a great way to make an important difference to the health of the rivers by preventing rubbish and discarded fishing waste making its way into the river system. “The event is now in its third year, and we are hoping the turnout this year will be the best we’ve seen.” Mr Menzies said DBCA…

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Environment Minister Stephen Dawson with grant recipients from the Bannister Creek Catchment Group

Grants awarded to community groups to protect river

17 community groups receive funding in first round of Community Rivercare Grants The not-for-profit volunteer groups will share $300,000 in 2018-19  The McGowan Labor Government has today announced the first round of grant recipients for its Community Rivercare Program, which will see $900,000 allocated to community groups over three years via the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions. The funding will help deliver projects including foreshore restoration and riverbank erosion, reduction of nutrient inflows, native waterbird conservation, native fish habitat protection and restocking of native recreational fish species.

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Yalgorup National Park to be expanded

Yalgorup National Park to be expanded

1,001 hectares to be added to internationally recognised Yalgorup National Park  The McGowan Labor Government has today announced it will add 1,001 hectares of Class A conservation reserve within world-renowned Yalgorup National Park. Located just over 100 kilometres south of Perth, Yalgorup National Park contains the internationally recognised Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar wetlands which provide habitat for migratory shorebird species as well as resident species such as the hooded plover.  Yalgorup National Park also supports critical habitat for the endangered Carnaby's cockatoo and the vulnerable listed western ringtail possum. This reservation in the heart of Yalgorup National Park will ensure the long-term management and protection of critically important banksia and tuart woodlands. The move is part of the State Government's plan to increase the protection of threatened…

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Invasive aquatic plant found in Perth waterway

Invasive aquatic plant found in Perth waterway

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions is calling on Perth residents to help manage the spread of Amazon frogbit, following its discovery in a Perth waterway. Amazon frogbit, a highly invasive aquatic weed that can impact on river health and biodiversity, was first spotted in Bayswater Brook in late December. Originating from Central and South America, the Amazon frogbit (Limnobium laevigatum) spreads rapidly via fragments that are readily detached from the parent plant. Each plant fragment can produce multiple seed pods with each pod containing 20-30 seeds that are viable for at least three years. It is sold in Western Australia for use in aquariums, however when disposed of inappropriately the plant has the potential to cause widespread devastation by congesting drains, waterways and…

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