Notification: Parks and Wildlife Service is part of the new Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA).

Media statements

Media statements (397)

Perth NRM Deputy Chair Dr Bruce Hegge, Alcoa Director of human resources Brian Doy, DBCA River Systems Manager Mark Cugley, State NRM conference MC Verity James and Malcolm James McCusker AC CVO QC at the awards.

Swan Alcoa Landcare Program wins Landcare Award

The success of community partnerships in delivering environmental outcomes for the Swan and Canning rivers has been recognised with the Swan Alcoa Landcare Program (SALP) winning the Australian Government Partnership category at the WA Landcare awards last night. Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) Director General Mark Webb said SALP was an excellent example of how industry, government and community were working together to improve local environments along Perth’s iconic river system. “For 19 years SALP has been providing urban community groups with a simple process to access funding for a wide range of landcare activities throughout the Swan and Canning catchments,” he said. “Projects it has supported range from invasive weed control, feral bee removal and dieback management to improving water quality in…

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Fox captured on a remote camera

Pilbara fox baiting program to protect native animals

Native wildlife recovery on the Burrup Peninsula and Dampier Archipelago is to be given a boost with a fox baiting program planned for the area in October. The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) Parks and Wildlife Service and the Murujuga Ranger Team will bait in Murujuga National Park, Dolphin Island, Angel Island and Gidley Island as part of the Western Shield fauna recovery program. Parks and Wildlife Service Pilbara nature conservation leader Coral Rowston said dried meat baits containing 1080 poison would be dispersed by aircraft, with further ground baiting throughout the year. “This baiting will help us to protect native species that are susceptible to predation by foxes, including the Rothschild’s rock wallaby, the threatened northern quoll and four species of marine…

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Western swamp tortoise being released into Moore River Nature Reserve

Thirty of Australia’s most endangered reptile species released

Conservation efforts to save one of the nation’s most critically endangered reptiles from extinction reached another milestone today with the release of 30 western swamp tortoises (Pseudemydura umbrina) into Moore River Nature Reserve, north of Perth. Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) Senior Research ScientistDr Gerald Kuchling said today’s release was crucial in strengthening wild populations of the species with only four known and monitored populations in WA. “The western swamp tortoise is Australia’s rarest and most critically endangered reptile, with habitat loss, low rainfall and predation by foxes, pigs, rats and ravens the major causes for its decline,” he said. “Less than 50 individuals survived 30 years ago, but since 1988 in a collaborative partnership with Perth Zoo we have been running a…

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Native reptiles seized by wildlife officers

Native reptiles seized by wildlife officers

Almost one hundred native reptiles, including a highly venomous death adder snake, have been intercepted in the Goldfields before they could be sold illegally. Wildlife officers from the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) seized six parcels that contained 94 reptiles in Kalgoorlie last week. The reptiles could attract up to $150,000 on the black market. Wildlife officer Matt Swan said 21 different reptile species were recovered from the failed smuggling operation. “These included barking geckos, Stimson’s pythons and bobtail lizards, as well as venomous species such as the mulga snake and whip snake,” Mr Swan said. “The reptiles have come from locations across WA, including the Wheatbelt, Goldfields, Midwest and Pilbara. “Posting animals in packages is not only illegal but cruel and inhumane.”…

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Native rodent rediscovered in the Kimberley

Native rodent rediscovered in the Kimberley

The black-footed tree-rat, a species that has not been seen in the Kimberley since 1987, has been rediscovered by staff from the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA).   Researchers caught a glimpse of what appeared to be a black-footed tree-rat during regular mammal monitoring at Bachsten Creek in the remote north-west Kimberley last year.   DBCA Parks and Wildlife Service ecologist Ben Corey said remote field cameras deployed over the wet season confirmed the existence of the species once the cameras were collected after eight months in the field.   “Many species, such as the endangered northern quoll and golden-backed tree-rat, as well as sugar gliders and scaly-tailed possums were recorded,” Mr Corey said.   “However, the biggest surprise was photographic evidence of…

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