Media statements

Media statements (454)

Leopard seal at a Rockingham beach

Seals rest up on local beaches

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding people that seals resting on beaches should be left undisturbed, following numerous recent sightings of seals on the Perth and south-west coast. Wildlife officer Cameron Craigie said it was common for species including the leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), sub-Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) to come ashore during winter fronts. Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea) also haul up on Carnac Island. “These seals haul up on beaches to rest – they are not ‘stranded’ and don’t require assistance from people,” Mr Craigie said. “Generally they just need to be left alone to rest and will return to the ocean when they are ready. “Members of the public are encouraged to leave…

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 Trevor Brown and Wayne Lloyd cutting down calotropis plants and applying chemicals to the stumps

Weed removal success in the west Kimberley

Department of Parks and Wildlife staff recently carried out work to eradicate a fast spreading weed threatening native animals and plants in King Leopold Ranges Conservation Park, 240km north-east of Derby. Parks and Wildlife conservation officer Allan Bennett along with four conservation employees who travelled from the south-west of WA spent two weeks treating more than 3500 calotropis (Calotropis procera) plants in the Millie Windie valley, an area of significant conservation value. The plant is a medium-sized shrub or small tree which can grow to 4m tall. “The team was also joined by the Bunuba rangers, traditional owners of the area, who have been working with the department to remove calotropis over several years which outcompetes native plants for sunlight, water and nutrients, which means…

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Entangled whale off Geraldton coast

Entangled whale tracked off Geraldton coast

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is urging boaters and beach visitors near Horrocks north of Geraldton to be on the lookout for an entangled humpback whale. The whale was first sighted north of Kalbarri on Sunday and again late yesterday by a beach fisherman off Lucky Bay. It has since been re-sighted by Parks and Wildlife staff 10km off Horrocks. Geraldton district manager Rory Chapple said it has a rope entangled around its tail flukes and is towing two large orange buoys. “It is currently travelling slowly in a southerly direction due to the gear it is carrying and appears to be malnourished,” he said. “We encourage boaties to report any sightings to the department and refrain from approaching the whale or attempting to…

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Saltwater crocodile within Lake Kununurra

Saltwater crocodile within Lake Kununurra

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding residents and visitors to be on alert for an estuarine (saltwater) crocodile believed to be in Lake Kununurra. There have been two confirmed sightings of the 2.5-3m crocodile inside the Lake Kununurra crocodile risk mitigation area in the last month. East Kimberley district manager Mathew Byers said the department was continuing efforts to locate and remove the animal, but it was proving elusive. “Warning signs have been placed at the lake’s popular swimming spots and we urge adults, their children and pets to stay out of the water and away from the water’s edge in all areas upstream from Crossing Falls boat ramp,” Mr Byers said. Estuarine crocodiles are highly mobile animals that can move great distances…

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More whale sightings expected this year on the Pilbara coast

More whale sightings expected this year on the Pilbara coast

More humpback whales will pass the Pilbara coast this year as larger numbers swim past our doorstep on their annual migration between the Antarctic and waters off the Kimberley coast. Department of Parks and Wildlife Pilbara Region marine program coordinator Dr Rachael Marshall said numbers of whales off the West Australian coast were on the rise. “The numbers of humpbacks have been slowly rising since commercial whaling for humpbacks ceased in 1963,” she said. “It tells us that this threatened species is in recovery.” Whales can be seen along the Pilbara coast between July and September. They travel up to 13,000km during what is believed to be one of the longest migrations of any animal on Earth. “The animals make this journey so they can…

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