Media statements

Media statements (454)

Great Southern drivers urged to watch out for blind kangaroos

Great Southern drivers urged to watch out for blind kangaroos

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is urging people to be vigilant when driving in and around the Great Southern area due to kangaroos that may be displaying abnormal behaviour as a result of a virus that causes blindness. District wildlife officer Mel Rowley said the choroid virus was transmitted to western grey kangaroos through mosquito and midge bites. “Since April, the department has recorded four cases of kangaroos showing signs of blindness believed to have been caused by the virus, however there are likely to have been many more similar cases which were never reported” she said. “The kangaroos affected by the virus appear to be uncoordinated and stumble into bushes, fences and other objects, particularly when disturbed. They are also usually extremely distressed.…

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Rock art conservator Dave Lambert advises Ngarinyin traditional owners

Kimberley traditional owners complete rock art course

A hands-on rock art conservation course coordinated by the Department of Parks and Wildlife has provided Kimberley Aboriginal groups with invaluable skills in art site protection and conservation. Projects and policy officer Jo Erskine said five traditional owner groups participated in the course, which focused on techniques for protecting art from damaging impacts including water wash from rain, and leaching of salts and minerals from the rock. “Rock art sites are of immense cultural importance to Aboriginal people and are an important part of maintaining their relationship to their land,” Ms Erskine said. “While many of the previous rock art projects in the Kimberley looked at scientific research relating to art dating, the aim of this project was to build specific skills in art site…

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Dampier Archipelago 1080 baiting program

Dampier Archipelago 1080 baiting program

As part of the statewide Western Shield native wildlife conservation program, the Department of Parks and Wildlife is baiting the Murujuga National Park and Dampier Archipelago in early October. Dried meat baits containing 1080 poison will be dispersed by aircraft on the Burrup Peninsula, Dolphin Island, Angel Island and Gidley Island. Parks and Wildlife operations officer Eleanor Killen said the purpose of the baiting program is to reduce fox numbers and to promote the recovery of animals such as the Rothschild rock wallaby and threatened sea turtle species. “Since the introduction of foxes and cats to Australia, many of our native fauna species have suffered heavy predation, with 27 mammal species becoming extinct in the past 200 years,” Ms Killen said. “A further 94 species…

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Spring brings out wildlife in Esperance

Spring brings out wildlife in Esperance

The arrival of spring and warmer weather means animal activity is on the increase around Esperance. Parks and Wildlife nature conservation coordinator Stephen Butler said swooping magpies could be intimidating for children and adults alike. “Magpies can swoop at people to deter potential or perceived threats to their eggs or chicks,” Mr Butler said. “The department advises avoiding the site where magpies are known to swoop and try not to provoke or harass the bird, as this may make them more defensive. “If you have to go through the swooping area you could deter the birds from swooping by wearing a hat, carrying an umbrella or holding a stick so it protrudes about 20cm above your head. “Wearing sunglasses may help protect the eyes, but…

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Visitor survey about Hamelin Bay jetty ruins

Visitor survey about Hamelin Bay jetty ruins

The community will be consulted about the future of the historic Hamelin Bay jetty ruins, following the recent installation of barrier fencing. Department of Parks and Wildlife officer Ben Tannock said a structural engineering assessment of the timber jetty remains indicated there were serious structural issues in the remaining piles and crossbeams. “Unfortunately the continuing deterioration of the structure means we have had to fence it off for safety reasons, while management options are considered,” Mr Tannock said. “The ruins of the jetty are a highly photographed and popular site and are synonymous with Hamelin Bay and its historic shipping past associated with the timber industry. “The options now being canvassed include dismantling the jetty and using the timber to create an interpretative seat and…

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