News and media statements

All Parks and Wildlife Service news items and media statements produced after mid-August 2019 are available on the new departmental website .

Media statements archive

Media statements archive

(This website contains news items and media statements produced prior to August 2019 only.)

Native hooting frog mistaken for a cane toad

Websites and app assist with cane toad identification

Spotted a cane toad or native frog? The Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) is encouraging people to use their mobile device or computer to check the difference. DPaW State Cane Toad Initiative program coordinator Corrin Everitt said if a suspected cane toad was discovered, members of the public could easily access online information and photographs to help with identification. “The department’s website www.dpaw.wa.gov.au has a section devoted to cane toads, native frog identification pictures and handy contacts,” Ms Everitt said. “The cane toad app in the iTunes store allows those with mobile devices are able to check identification features of seven native Kimberley frogs, along with cane toads in three stages of the life cycle. “Another good resource is the Western Australian Museum’s Alcoa…

Read more...

Getting crafty with snugglegum and cuddlenut

Kids’ holiday activities at Perth Hills Discovery Centre

Stop the kids from getting bored this October by heading for the hills to discover the exciting bush activities on offer at the Perth Hills Discovery Centre in Mundaring. The Department of Parks and Wildlife’s (DPaW) Nearer to Nature program has a variety of engaging and interactive education sessions aimed at children from four to 14 years of age. DPaW program coordinator Jill Francis said the bush craft Snugglegum and cuddlenut session on Thursday 10 October combined crafting with nature for four to seven year olds. “Little ones will be taken on a journey of discovery with Australian bush craft storytelling, a bush walk and making their very own gumnut baby and seed bag to take home.” If your child fancies being the boss of…

Read more...

DPaW research officer Meg Porter leads a group doing the fire fitness pack test at Matilda Bay in Crawley

Fighting fit for fire season

Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) staff are gearing up for the coming bushfire season by strapping on heavy backpacks and hitting the streets this month to test their fitness for the summer ahead. DPaW regional fire operations officer Bradley Reynolds said fire-related duties were often physically demanding and it was vital that staff involved in fire were healthy and in top shape. “People near Perth’s DPaW offices in Crawley and Kensington may have noticed groups of walkers marching quickly around the area and wearing strange, black vests,” he said. “They would have been taking part in the annual fire fitness assessment by doing what we call the ‘pack test’, which involves walking with a weighted vest carrying 11.3kg over a distance of 3.22km within…

Read more...

Seasonal crocodile alert

Seasonal crocodile alert

The Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) today advised Broome residents and visitors to remain on alert due to further estuarine (saltwater) crocodile sightings this week. There were two separate sightings of crocodiles, measuring approximately 3.5m and 2.5m, at Dampier Creek last weekend and another crocodile was sighted at Cable Beach on Monday 9 September. Cable Beach was closed by the Shire of Broome and reopened yesterday. DPaW wildlife officer Peter Carstairs said since the beginning of September, crocodile sightings had occurred in a number of popular locations including Cable Beach, Reddell Beach, Entrance Point and Dampier Creek. “Temporary warning signs have been installed at these locations and the department and Shire of Broome rangers are monitoring the situation,” he said. “People are strongly advised…

Read more...

Community donation to help western ground parrot recovery

Community donation to help western ground parrot recovery

Efforts to save the critically endangered western ground parrot have been boosted by the donation of $10,000 to the Department of Parks and Wildlife’s (DPaW) south coast region. The Friends of the Western Ground Parrot donated the funds so DPaW’s South Coast Threatened Birds Recovery Team (SCTBRT) can continue its work maintaining parrots currently in captivity. SCTBRT chair Sarah Comer said in the future captive breeding could play a vital role in the recovery of the western ground parrot. “We currently have seven captive western ground parrots, which has allowed us to develop husbandry techniques for a potential captive breeding program that can be used to re-establish wild populations,” Mrs Comer said. “The generous donation from the Friends of Western Ground Parrot community group will…

Read more...