News and media statements

All Parks and Wildlife Service news items and media statements produced after mid-August 2019 are available on the new departmental website .

Media statements archive

Media statements archive

(This website contains news items and media statements produced prior to August 2019 only.)

Little penguin at Penguin Island

Penguin Island reopens after rat baiting success

Penguin Island, home to Western Australia’s largest colony of little penguins, has reopened to tourists after a successful baiting program targeting destructive black rats. Environment Minister Albert Jacob said up to 5,000 rats had been eliminated from the island, increasing the chances of penguins and other seabirds breeding successfully. “The baiting program, which began in January this year, was necessary because introduced rats had become established on Penguin Island and were attacking birds, eggs, penguin chicks and native skinks,” Mr Jacob said. “I am pleased to say that since mid-May, only two rats have been detected on motion sensor cameras and baits have been laid to destroy these final few animals. “This is a dramatic reduction in rat numbers and it is hoped that after…

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Humpback whale and calf at Lalang-garram / Camden Sound Marine Park

Whales protected in Kimberley marine park plan

Humpback whale calving grounds will be protected and Aboriginal employment opportunities increased as part of the Lalang-garram / Camden Sound Marine Park Joint Management Agreement, signed today with traditional owners in Derby. The agreement, between the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) and the Dambimangari Aboriginal Corporation, is the first such agreement for any marine park in Western Australia. It confirms the Liberal National Government’s commitment to managing the park with traditional owners. In Derby today, Environment Minister Albert Jacob also released the Lalang-garram / Camden Sound Marine Park management plan, the first to be created for a marine park under the State Government’s Kimberley Science and Conservation Strategy. Mr Jacob said the plan outlined a range of strategies to conserve the values of the…

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Fire officer battles a bushfire on departmental land

DPaW firefighters busy in the south-west

Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) firefighters have been responding to more than a dozen fires across the State since early yesterday. DPaW regional duty officer Brad Barton said more than 50 personnel working out of 16 trucks and three earth-moving machines had been activated in DPaW’s Donnelly District alone to attack bushfires in the area and to assist with fires on private property. “Our staff have been working hard over the last 48 hours to get these fires under control and ensure they don’t impact lives, homes, infrastructure and our environment,” he said. “Thunderstorms brought lightning that started the fires in the area, which were fuelled by hot weather and some wind. One fire began as a result of a private landholder’s roadside burn-off.…

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“Mussels” the flatback turtle flexes muscles in ocean release

“Mussels” the flatback turtle flexes muscles in ocean release

  A rehabilitated juvenile flatback turtle called Mussels will be released into the wild today and tracked by the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) using satellite technology. The turtle is being flown to Broome for release into the ocean at Cable Beach after undergoing extensive rehabilitation at AQWA - the Aquarium of Western Australia since it was found in poor condition near Fremantle as a post-hatchling. DPaW marine science program principal scientist Scott Whiting said Broome was selected as a release location because it had known habitat for flatback turtles. “This turtle is extra special because it is one of only a few flatback turtles rehabilitated in Western Australia and satellite technology is being used to follow its movements,” Dr Whiting said. “A transmitter…

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Research centre opens its doors at Credo

Research centre opens its doors at Credo

A new multi-purpose field study centre for scientists working on significant environmental research projects in the Great Western Woodlands was officially opened today in the Goldfields. The $220,000 research centre, part of the Australian Supersite Network, is located at the Credo former pastoral station and has been established by a partnership between the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW), the CSIRO and the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), with support from the Goldfields Environmental Management Group. The centre was jointly funded by DPaW ($100,000), the Great Western Woodlands ($60,000), the CSIRO ($30,000) and the Goldfields Environmental Management Group ($30,000).  DPaW Parks and Visitors Services regional leader Nigel Wessels said the facility would be used by scientists involved in research projects aimed at providing a better…

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