Media statements

Media statements (455)

Mussels the flatback turtle

“Mussels” the flatback turtle flexes muscles in ocean release

  A rehabilitated juvenile flatback turtle called Mussels will be released into the wild today and tracked by the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) using satellite technology. The turtle is being flown to Broome for release into the ocean at Cable Beach after undergoing extensive rehabilitation at AQWA - the Aquarium of Western Australia since it was found in poor condition near Fremantle as a post-hatchling. DPaW marine science program principal scientist Scott Whiting said Broome was selected as a release location because it had known habitat for flatback turtles. “This turtle is extra special because it is one of only a few flatback turtles rehabilitated in Western Australia and satellite technology is being used to follow its movements,” Dr Whiting said. “A transmitter…

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The new Credo Field Study Centre

Research centre opens its doors at Credo

A new multi-purpose field study centre for scientists working on significant environmental research projects in the Great Western Woodlands was officially opened today in the Goldfields. The $220,000 research centre, part of the Australian Supersite Network, is located at the Credo former pastoral station and has been established by a partnership between the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW), the CSIRO and the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), with support from the Goldfields Environmental Management Group. The centre was jointly funded by DPaW ($100,000), the Great Western Woodlands ($60,000), the CSIRO ($30,000) and the Goldfields Environmental Management Group ($30,000).  DPaW Parks and Visitors Services regional leader Nigel Wessels said the facility would be used by scientists involved in research projects aimed at providing a better…

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Magpies swoop in for spring

Magpies swoop in for spring

The Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) is reminding people to watch out for swooping magpies, after receiving a string of reports from the public. During the last seven weeks, the department has received more than 70 calls about magpies displaying aggressive behaviour towards people in the Perth metropolitan area. DPaW wildlife officer Teagan Johnston said magpies were most active during the spring months. “We expect that the number of calls from concerned residents who encounter an aggressive magpie will rise sharply as we approach summer,” she said. “Male magpies are territorial and may swoop at people if they think their nest or offspring are being threatened but they are only doing what comes naturally to them when defending their young ones. “If magpies pose…

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Cable Beach community turtle monitoring with the Yawuru Rangers

Cable Beach community turtle monitoring with the Yawuru Rangers

It is the nesting season for flatback turtles and local residents are encouraged to participate in the Cable Beach community turtle monitoring program, coordinated by the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) and the Yawuru joint management team. Monitoring begins in early November and runs throughout the turtle nesting period, which coincides with the Yawuru seasons ‘laja’ and ‘man-gala’’, said Yawuru program leader Sharon Ferguson. “As part of the monitoring, staff and volunteers conduct early morning walks along sections of Cable Beach and identify, record and report on nesting activity,” Ms Ferguson said. “Flatback turtles (Natator depressus) are the main species to use Cable Beach as a nesting site and many people may be unaware that we are lucky enough to have turtles nesting on…

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Watch whales safely at Ngari Capes Marine Park

Watch whales safely at Ngari Capes Marine Park

With the whale watching season in full swing, boaters are being reminded to maintain a safe distance from these mighty creatures as they migrate south. Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) officer Pia Courtis said the Ngari Capes Marine Park between Busselton and Augusta was a prime venue to spot humpback and southern right whales and calves returning from the State’s far north to feeding areas in Antarctic waters. “In southern Western Australia this is a fantastic time of year to enjoy whale watching and we just ask that people follow some simple guidelines when they’re out on the water,” Ms Courtis said. “The most important thing is not to approach within 100m of a whale – this is for the safety of people onboard…

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