Media statements

Media statements (455)

Whale carcass at Emu Point, Albany

Humpback whale death on beach in Albany

A sub-adult humpback whale has died of natural causes on Emu Point beach, Albany, on Saturday 12 April. The 6.5m whale, estimated to be about 12-months-old and weighing 3.2 tonnes, stranded on the beach overnight on Friday and was reported to the Department of Parks and Wildlife at 7.30am. Parks and Wildlife Nature Conservation Regional Leader Deon Utber said the whale was alive when department staff arrived at the beach but died a short time later. “The whale was in very poor condition and severely emaciated,” Mr Utber said. “It died of natural causes at 9.15am. “There was an injury on its flank but this did not contribute to the cause of death.” Officers from Department of Fisheries and WA Police also attended the beach…

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Rock bolt at Salmon Holes

Visitors to South Coast national parks urged to take extra care

Visitors to South Coast national parks are being urged to put their safety first when spending time near the ocean during Easter and the school holidays. Department of Parks and Wildlife Albany district manager Peter Hartley said while the southern coastline was often at its best during March-April, the Southern Ocean could also be unpredictable and dangerous. "At this time of year there is an influx of visitors to the beautiful and unique areas Parks and Wildlife manages, especially with the attraction of catching Australian salmon,” Mr Hartley said. “We urge everyone to always consider their personal safety and fish from sandy beaches where possible. “If you are fishing from rocks, extra care and precautions are strongly recommended to ensure lives are protected from potential…

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L-R Dale Steward CEO Shire of Denmark, 3 millionth visitor Annette Moody, Denmark shire councillor Ian Osborne

Three million reasons to celebrate the Tree Top Walk

The magnificent Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk in Walpole-Nornalup National Park reached a significant milestone today when it welcomed its three-millionth visitor. Environment Minister Albert Jacob said it highlighted the success of the nature-based tourist and cultural attraction. “This is a great result for the site which has been open since August 1996 and is managed by the Department of Parks and Wildlife. It’s wonderful to see so many people enjoying one of the State’s star attractions,” Mr Jacob said. “It features a remarkable 600m walkway that is positioned 40m above the ground amid the spectacular heights of the ancient tingle forest canopy. It was built to allow people to enjoy the forest without causing an adverse impact on the trees. “The Tree…

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Public asked to help protect Australian sea lions

Public asked to help protect Australian sea lions

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is urging people to help protect Australian sea lions and interact safely with the threatened marine mammals. The call comes after the department released CCTV video footage of a man harassing sea lions on Carnac Island Nature Reserve, 10km south-west of Fremantle. The department is investigating the incident, which took place at 11am on Monday 10 March 2014. Senior wildlife officer Rick Dawson said adult male and sub-adult male Australian sea lions frequently haul out, or rest, on Carnac Island and should not be disturbed. “The vision of the man slapping and harassing sea lions is alarming,” Mr Dawson said. “These are wild animals weighing up to 200kg, with large teeth and if disturbed, they have been known to…

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Large beaked whale close to Perth beaches

Large beaked whale close to Perth beaches

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is monitoring a five metre beaked whale that has been seen swimming along Perth shores over the past week. Senior marine wildlife officer Doug Coughran believed the behaviour of the animal was consistent with a gray’s beaked whale, which was rarely seen so close to Perth shores. “The whale has been sighted just 20m offshore between Cottesloe and Fremantle beaches for several days,” Mr Coughran said. “While it is difficult to know for certain why the whale is coming into shallower waters, it is possible that it is due to illness and we will continue to monitor the situation but we will not intervene unless it comes ashore. “Obviously we understand the curiosity beachgoers may have to get close…

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