Media statements

Media statements (455)

Banksia anatona

Renewed optimism for critically endangered plants

The discovery of new seedlings from three critically endangered plants has given scientists renewed hope in saving important native plant populations. New populations of cactus banksia (Banksia anatona), Foote’s grevillea (Grevillea calliantha) and the round-leaf honeysuckle (Lambertia orbifolia subsp. Orbifolia) were established by staff from the Department of Parks and Wildlife at various sites throughout the state’s south-west between 1998 and 2009. The species are threatened by severe habitat fragmentation, phytophthora disease, weeds and grazing. Research scientist Leonie Monks said finding new seedlings in the populations shows they are reproducing and establishing naturally. We are finally starting to see successful reproduction from the plantings that took place several years ago which is very exciting,” she said. “Seeds were collected from existing populations of the plants…

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Fortescue Falls

Peak season approaching for Karijini camp sites

Travellers to Karijini National Park are being encouraged to arrive at camp sites early in the day to ensure they secure a spot during the school holidays. Department of Parks and Wildlife senior ranger Ivan Thrash said campgrounds often filled to capacity quickly during July and August. “There are two main camping sites available in Karijini and they are located at Dales Gorge and Karijini Eco Retreat,” he said. “Arriving early in the day allows people enough time to check if there are any spaces available during the busy period and to consider alternative accommodation options outside of the national park if the campgrounds are full. “Other possible accommodation options include Tom Price, which is 90km west of Karijini and is the nearest town, or…

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Ngurrawaana ranger Derek Ball and Parks and Wildlife officer Allen Clarke wet down a tree during a prescribed burn at Millstream Chichester National Park

Prescribed burns help prepare Pilbara for fire season

Prescribed burns designed to protect people travelling on well-used roads and key park infrastructure have recently been carried out in the Pilbara region by Department of Parks and Wildlife staff. With the fire season set to start by October, Pilbara regional fire coordinator Richard Boykett said strategic burns in Karijini and Millstream Chichester national parks in late May and early June would provide protection to valuable public assets. “Areas targeted include a buffer alongside Munjina Road and the Auski roadhouse, adjacent to Karijini National Park,” Mr Boykett said. “Several areas in Millstream Chichester National Park were burnt to protect Parks and Wildlife and Water Corporation infrastructure, as well as the vegetation of the Fortescue River delta.” Pilbara Parks and Wildlife staff were assisted with the…

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Protecting the nature of the Kimberley

Protecting the nature of the Kimberley

The Landscape Conservation Initiative—the largest conservation project ever undertaken in Western Australia—was established in 2011 as part of the State Government's Kimberley Science and Conservation Strategy, to retain and enhance the high biodiversity and landscape values in the north Kimberley.This visionary project is being implemented by the Department of Parks and Wildlife in collaboration with native title holders and Indigenous ranger groups, government agencies, non-government organisations and pastoralists to protect biodiversity values across property boundaries in the north and central Kimberley. Find out about our key achievements so far.

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Local trainee wins Parks and Wildlife award

Local trainee wins Parks and Wildlife award

Diligence, dedication and perseverance are just some of the qualities shown by award-winning Kununurra-based Department of Parks and Wildlife trainee Keith Boombi. Mr Boombi was recently named the 2014 Aboriginal Trainee of the Year at the department’s annual graduation and awards celebration. Parks and Wildlife workplace assessor Steven Leeder said Mr Boombi deserved to be recognised. “Keith has shown personal resilience, willingness to take on increased levels of responsibility and perseverance and dedication to his studies throughout his traineeship,” Mr Leeder said. “Since his first involvement with the department’s student Bush Rangers program and assisting with biodiversity surveys in 2011, Keith has been motivated to complete his schooling and become a ranger. “Through the Parks and Wildlife Mentored Aboriginal Training and Employment Scheme, Keith is…

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