News and media statements

All Parks and Wildlife Service news items and media statements produced after mid-August 2019 are available on the new departmental website .

Media statements archive

Media statements archive

(This website contains news items and media statements produced prior to August 2019 only.)

Enjoying the Cocky Capers activity

Sunlit spring school holiday activities

  From ‘Cocky capers’ to ‘Bush Survival’, ‘Ramble with a ranger’ and “Deadly and dangerous’, it’s all happening in the Perth Hills as part of the Nearer to Nature school holiday program this October. Run by the Department of Parks and Wildlife and featuring fun, hands-on learning in the natural environment, there are a wide range of activities suitable for the whole family. Check out the activities on offer at the Perth Hills Discovery Centre in Mundaring throughout the school holidays.  Nearer to Nature program coordinator Berdina Ballast said the ‘Cocky capers’ activity for four to seven-year-olds was great fun. “This is a hands-on activity and kids can discover the types of places our cockatoos call home, what they eat and why they have such…

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Dugite suns itself

Snakes emerge with warmer weather

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding people to be aware that snake activity is on the rise with warmer spring weather. Wildlife officer Emma Lipianin said snake encounters would increase as reptiles emerged from winter hibernation to bask in the sun. “Snakes are most active over the next few months and we expect the number of calls from concerned residents who come across a snake will rise sharply,” she said. “We recommend people take extra care when venturing outdoors, particularly near swamps, lakes and bushland. “Snakes will normally try to avoid humans, but it is best to be aware and take precautions such as wearing long pants and enclosed shoes while walking along bush trails.” Ms Lipianin said most snake bites occurred when…

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Ducklings spotted at a Perth lake

Give way to ducklings

Spring has sprung in Perth with ducklings starting to emerge from their nests in search of the nearest wetland, prompting a reminder from the Department of Parks and Wildlife for people to exercise caution on roads near water bodies. Wildlife officer Emma Lipianin said ducks often nested in tree hollows a considerable distance away from the water and once their young hatched, mothers had a long journey ahead of them to bring their ducklings to the nearest wetland. “This often results in the ducklings attempting to cross roads and cycle paths as they try to get to their destination,” she said. “Ducks on the move have been known to bring major highways and even the Mitchell Freeway to a halt, so we ask motorists and…

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Whale disentangled off Geraldton coast

Whale disentangled off Geraldton coast

A whale disentanglement team from the Department of Parks and Wildlife has successfully disentangled a humpback whale north-west of Geraldton with assistance from the Department of Fisheries and Kalbarri Volunteer Sea Rescue. The 8m sub-adult whale, with rope entangled around its tail and towing two large orange buoys, was first reported on Sunday north of Kalbarri and there were further sightings over the next two days near Horrocks beach north of Geraldton. The disentanglement team was mobilised on Tuesday, but was unable to carry out the rescue until late yesterday afternoon (Thursday 28 August), 20 nautical miles off the Geraldton coast. The whale had been re-sighted by Parks and Wildlife staff from the air. Midwest regional manager Anthony Desmond said after first carefully assessing the…

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Seals rest up on local beaches

Seals rest up on local beaches

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding people that seals resting on beaches should be left undisturbed, following numerous recent sightings of seals on the Perth and south-west coast. Wildlife officer Cameron Craigie said it was common for species including the leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), sub-Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) to come ashore during winter fronts. Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea) also haul up on Carnac Island. “These seals haul up on beaches to rest – they are not ‘stranded’ and don’t require assistance from people,” Mr Craigie said. “Generally they just need to be left alone to rest and will return to the ocean when they are ready. “Members of the public are encouraged to leave…

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