News and media statements

All Parks and Wildlife Service news items and media statements produced after mid-August 2019 are available on the new departmental website .

Media statements archive

Media statements archive

(This website contains news items and media statements produced prior to August 2019 only.)

View of Barren Ranges from Pt Ann at Fitzgerald River National Park

Enjoy south coast parks during ANZAC commemorations

A visit to some of Albany’s magnificent parks and reserves will be on the agenda for many people visiting Albany during the ANZAC convoy commemorations. Department of Parks and Wildlife district manager Peter Hartley urged visitors to enjoy the area’s scenic national parks and nature reserves responsibly. “This is a great opportunity to explore the beautiful south coast and we are asking people to be courteous and mindful of other park users,” Mr Hartley said. “As bins are not provided at the majority of our sites, visitors are requested to take out what they bring in. “We would like to remind people that Parks and Wildlife conducts 1080 fox baiting in this area and for safety reasons we do not allow pet dogs or cats…

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Checking the crocodile fence in Ord River Nature Reserve

New fence protects estuarine crocodile habitat

Estuarine crocodile nesting sites in the Ord River Nature Reserve have been separated from wandering cattle with a new 20km fence constructed by the Department of Parks and Wildlife. The fence, when combined with existing pastoral property fences, safeguards approximately 1500 hectares of valuable estuarine (saltwater) crocodile nesting habitat, said Parks and Wildlife officer Trent Stillman. “The Ord River is recognised as one of the most significant breeding sites for this species in WA,” Mr Stillman said. “In past years, up to 1000 head of cattle have been observed grazing within the boundary of the nature reserve. “On a number of occasions they have been rounded up and removed, but over time they have reinvaded the riverine grasslands within the reserve. “Cattle trample and disturb…

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Whale carcass at Groper Bay

Steer clear of whale carcass near Peaceful Bay

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is advising people to avoid a whale carcass caught in rocks at Groper Bay, near Peaceful Bay, on the south coast between Walpole and Denmark. The significantly decomposed carcass, which is approximately 8m in length, may attract sharks, posing a risk to swimmers and other users of the coastal environment. People are asked not to interfere with the whale carcass for health and safety reasons. It is not feasible to remove the carcass because it is partially submerged in water and the area is not readily accessible to vessels. Warning signage will be installed at the beach and Parks and Wildlife is working with the Shire of Denmark regarding nearby Peaceful Bay beach, which is a popular swimming area.…

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Territorial magpies prepare to swoop

Territorial magpies prepare to swoop

  The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding people to be on the lookout for swooping magpies, after receiving 50 reports during the past six weeks from concerned Perth residents who had encountered aggressive magpies. Wildlife officer Emma Lipianin said magpies were most active as summer approached. “Magpies generally nest between August and October and during this time the urge to protect their eggs and young is very strong,” she said. “Male magpies are territorial and may swoop at people if they think their nest or offspring are being threatened but they are only doing what comes naturally to them when defending their young ones. “They rely largely on intimidating anyone they see as a threat by flying low and fast over them, and…

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Great Southern drivers urged to watch out for blind kangaroos

Great Southern drivers urged to watch out for blind kangaroos

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is urging people to be vigilant when driving in and around the Great Southern area due to kangaroos that may be displaying abnormal behaviour as a result of a virus that causes blindness. District wildlife officer Mel Rowley said the choroid virus was transmitted to western grey kangaroos through mosquito and midge bites. “Since April, the department has recorded four cases of kangaroos showing signs of blindness believed to have been caused by the virus, however there are likely to have been many more similar cases which were never reported” she said. “The kangaroos affected by the virus appear to be uncoordinated and stumble into bushes, fences and other objects, particularly when disturbed. They are also usually extremely distressed.…

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