Media statements

Media statements (455)

Repairs to Hamelin Bay jetty ruins

Repairs begin on Hamelin Bay jetty ruins

Timbers from the original Busselton jetty are helping repair the historic Hamelin Bay jetty ruins in Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park. Department of Parks and Wildlife officer Ben Tannock said aged timbers provided by the City of Busselton had been used to replace five severely deteriorated cross beams from the Hamelin Bay structure. “Given the historical significance of both jetties to this area, it is fitting that beams from the original Busselton jetty are being recycled at Hamelin Bay,” Mr Tannock said. “The department appreciates of the City of Busselton’s contribution to this repair project.” Mr Tannock said a timber specialist contracted by the department replaced the cross beams in the last week of November. Further strengthening works using stainless steel rods and jacketing of two piles…

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Dolphin calf with Surprise

New dolphin at Monkey Mia – mother and baby doing well

  One of the popular dolphins at the world-famous Monkey Mia has given birth, the first new arrival of the season. Department of Parks and Wildlife officers are keeping a close eye on the calf and its mother Surprise to ensure they thrive. Monkey Mia Dolphin Experience manager Cath Roberts said the calf, born yesterday 10 December, was the seventh for Surprise since the inception of the world-renowned dolphin program. Ms Roberts said it was extremely important that mother and calf be carefully protected in the first few weeks of the calf's life. “The Monkey Mia dolphins are of great research significance worldwide and even though this is Surprise’s seventh calf, great care needs to be taken to ensure the newborn is given the greatest…

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Vehicle tracks through flatback turtle nests

Leave turtle nests and eggs undisturbed

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding members of the public to leave marine turtle nests and eggs undisturbed, to maximise potential breeding success. Pilbara region senior marine ranger Chris Roy said the department had recently received reports of people disturbing nests in the Port Hedland and Wickham areas.    “It is nesting season over the next few months and it is important people allow this natural process to take place unhindered,” Mr Roy said. “Since very few marine turtle hatchlings survive to adulthood and reproductive age, we should be doing all we can to ensure successful incubation and hatching to promote the long-term survival of these threatened species. “Please leave turtle nests alone and avoid driving on beaches where turtles nest from November…

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Cameras to monitor foxes and feral cats in the forest

Cameras to monitor foxes and feral cats in the forest

Foxes and feral cats will be monitored with remote infrared camera technology as part of an intensive fox baiting program from north of Dwellingup to south of Collie to protect iconic threatened species including the woylie, numbat and chuditch. Cameras have been deployed as part of a large study across three 10,000ha sites in the northern jarrah forest, including one area which is aerially baited six times a year and two non-baited control sites, under the Department of Parks and Wildlife’s Western Shield animal conservation program. The cameras will be in place for 12 months and will monitor fox and feral cat activity as well as observe native animals in the area. Western Shield coordinator Ashley Millar said the camera monitoring would help the Department…

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Estuarine Crocodile alert as the wet season approaches

Estuarine Crocodile alert as the wet season approaches

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding Kimberley residents and visitors about increased estuarine (saltwater) crocodile activity as the wet season approaches. Parks and Wildlife Kimberley regional manager Daryl Moncrieff said members of the public should remain vigilant when approaching waterways, where estuarine crocodiles may be located. “People should be particularly careful with small children and pets because they are more susceptible to crocodile attacks,” Mr Moncrieff said. “For your own safety, do not approach crocodiles and exercise caution in areas where they occur. “This includes not swimming, canoeing, using small boats or cleaning fish close to the water and maintaining a safe distance from the water when fishing. “Also please be careful when launching or retrieving boats.” Mr Moncrieff said estuarine crocodiles nested over…

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