Media statements

Media statements (421)

Releasing a rock wallaby in Kalbarri National Park. Photo: WWF Australia

Rock wallabies bounce back in Kalbarri after translocation

The small but thriving population of rock wallabies in Kalbarri National Park has received a further boost, with 25 more wallabies introduced into the park this week. The third and final translocation of the species into the park over three years, brings the number of radio-collared wallabies, introduced from Wheatbelt reserves and Cape Range National Park, in the Pilbara to 72. Black flanked rock wallabies were considered extinct from Kalbarri National Park for 20 years, until two wallabies were filmed in a gorge in 2015. The translocation is a collaboration between the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) and WWF Australia.

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Prescribed burning was carried out across various tenures surrounding Kalbarri, including Kalbarri National Park, to create a strategic buffer.

Prescribed burning protecting Kalbarri

The Parks and Wildlife Service at the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions has just completed 4000 hectares of prescribed burning around the Kalbarri town site and across Kalbarri National Park together with the Kalbarri Volunteer Fire Brigade (KVFB) and other stakeholders. The week-long operation involved more than 50 staff and volunteers from Parks and Wildlife Service, KVFB, the Department of Fire and Emergency Services, Western Mulga, the Shire of Northampton, Water Corporation WA, and the Midwest Aboriginal Ranger Program. A video of the successful operation is available at: Kalbarri prescribed burning Senior operations officer Michael Raykos said the burning was the culmination of recent efforts by Parks and Wildlife Service and KVFB to develop a tenure-blind bushfire mitigation plan to protect Kalbarri town site.…

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Wedge tailed eagle

Wedge-tailed eagles targeted

Wheatbelt residents are being encouraged to use strategies to reduce the risk of livestock falling prey to wedge-tailed eagles this lambing season. Parks and Wildlife Service regional wildlife officer Melanie Rowley said there were various ways to help protect livestock from Australia’s largest bird of prey on private property. “Often eagles are seen to be the culprits but they can often be innocently hanging around to clean up after a fox kill or after the death of a sick animal,” she said. “People can apply for a damage licence to scare the birds. “Regularly baiting and culling foxes on farming property is another option as foxes are often responsible for killing or distressing young lambs, which in turn attracts eagles. “Providing an alternative food source…

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219 native animals recovered from illegal smuggling attempt

219 native animals recovered from illegal smuggling attempt

Two-hundred and nineteen native animals have been recovered from an alleged smuggling operation after being discovered in a vehicle near Eucla, 1200km east of Perth. This is the largest seizure of native animals ever undertaken in WA. WA Police Force intercepted the speeding vehicle on Eyre Highway, 20m west of Mundrabilla and discovered 15 large bags and around 15 plastic containers and bottles housing 198 reptiles, of which 58 are venomous, 16 marsupials, three cockroaches and two spiders. WA Police Force seized the animals and handed them to the Parks and Wildlife Service for identification, a health assessment and holding. The animals are being assessed by vets at Perth Zoo.

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219 native animals recovered from illegal smuggling attempt

219 native animals recovered from illegal smuggling attempt

Two-hundred and nineteen native animals have been recovered from an alleged smuggling operation after being discovered in a vehicle near Eucla, 1200km east of Perth. This is the largest seizure of native animals ever undertaken in WA. WA Police Force intercepted the speeding vehicle on Eyre Highway, 20m west of Mundrabilla and discovered 15 large bags and around 15 plastic containers and bottles housing 198 reptiles, of which 58 are venomous, 16 marsupials, three cockroaches and two spiders. WA Police Force seized the animals and handed them to the Parks and Wildlife Service for identification, a health assessment and holding. The animals are being assessed by vets at Perth Zoo. WA Police Force are leading the investigation into unlawful possession and animal welfare cruelty of…

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