News and media statements

All Parks and Wildlife Service news items and media statements produced after mid-August 2019 are available on the new departmental website .

Media statements archive

Media statements archive

(This website contains news items and media statements produced prior to August 2019 only.)

Learning more about endangered northern quolls in the Pilbara

Learning more about endangered northern quolls in the Pilbara

A workshop to be hosted tomorrow by the Department of Parks and Wildlife will examine the progress of previously-developed research priorities for the endangered northern quoll in the Pilbara region. Assistant Director of Science Dr Stephen van Leeuwen said the workshop would review and, if necessary, update the Pilbara Northern Quoll Research Plan developed in 2013. “This meeting will build on two previous workshops and focus on what we have learnt over the previous three years and in what direction this research will now head,” Dr van Leeuwen said. The northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus) is a predatory marsupial once distributed widely across northern Australia. Male northern quolls invest so much into a frenetic, competitive breeding season that they undergo immune system collapse, and almost all…

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Female golden whistler on a Land for Wildlife property

New partnership for Land for Wildlife conservation program

The Department of Parks and Wildlife’s Land for Wildlife conservation program is partnering with NRM WA to help participants manage their bushland for wildlife habitat. Land for Wildlife is a voluntary scheme to encourage and assist private landholders to provide habitat for wildlife in bushland on their property. There are currently 1941 registered landholders, with a total of 286,614 hectares of bushland being managed as wildlife habitat through the program. Parks and Wildlife Director General Jim Sharp said the collaboration with NRM WA regional organisations would benefit private land managers and the State’s biodiversity conservation. “This agreement and partnership arrangements with the NRM organisations is an exciting development for private land conservation in Western Australia,” Mr Sharp said. “Parks and Wildlife has run Land for…

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Crocodile trapped and removed from Wyndham boat ramp

Crocodile trapped at Wyndham

The Department of Parks and Wildlife has trapped and removed a saltwater crocodile from the Wyndham boat ramp area today. Parks and Wildlife East Kimberley district manager Luke Bentley said the 3.8m crocodile was being transferred to the Malcolm Douglas Crocodile Park in Broome. “This animal was reported to the department last month and its increasingly confident behaviour was becoming a concern,” Mr Bentley said. “It was trailing boats, climbing onto the back of boats and also onto the floating pontoon jetty.” Mr Bentley said department staff, along with the Balanggarra rangers, installed a trap at the boat ramp several weeks ago. “We were advised the croc was caught in the trap on the weekend and after waiting a few days to allow any food…

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Strategic prescribed burns creating buffer for Perth

Strategic prescribed burns creating buffer for Perth

More than 20,000ha of prescribed burning is planned for State forest in the Perth Hills area during the next week, as part of plans to create strategic buffers to help protect communities from damaging bushfires. The Department of Parks and Wildlife has already completed a large area of the buffer and is on track to undertake more burning next week, depending on weather conditions. It is intended to begin a 8,000ha burn today, with the remainder of the prescribed burns planned over the next week. Parks and Wildlife Director Regional and Fire Management Services, Peter Dans said prescribed burns were being carried out near Bedfordale, Wundowie and Jarrahdale today, including 12kms of burn edging near Mundaring. “This prescribed burning may generate a significant amount of…

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Seeds of change: plants for a changing climate

Seeds of change: plants for a changing climate

Success rates for restoring land destroyed by pests and weeds looks set for a boost following a new proposal by scientists. A study by Western Australia’s Department of Parks and Wildlife has found that restoration projects are more likely to succeed if plants are selected based on their suitability to adapt to a changing climate, rather than what was previously grown in the area. “Restoring natural areas that have been degraded by pests and weeds, or impacted by industry, is an essential part of conserving habitats for our unique flora and fauna, and reducing the impact of climate change,” said Dr Cristina Ramalho, lead scientist on the study. In the past, seeds for restoration projects were selected based on surveys of the local area. Dr…

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