News and media statements

All Parks and Wildlife Service news items and media statements produced after mid-August 2019 are available on the new departmental website .

The Department of Parks and Wildlife has today captured and shot a rogue estuarine (saltwater) crocodile that was responsible for killing livestock near Kununurra.
 
East Kimberley district manager Bill Dempsey said during the last six months, the 3.5m crocodile ventured onto rural residential properties on the Lower Ord River and displayed aggressive behaviour toward landowners and their livestock.
 
“A vet has confirmed the crocodile recently killed a horse, and savaged a cow that later had to be put down. The same crocodile is also suspected of killing a domestic dog,” he said. 
 
“While the Lower Ord is known to be crocodile habitat, and is outside the Lake Kununurra Crocodile Management Zone, this animal’s aggressive behaviour posed a serious threat to human safety which is why we destroyed it.”
 
In the west Kimberley yesterday, Parks and Wildlife staff shot another estuarine crocodile near Cable Beach as a last option, after several attempts to trap the threatening animal failed. 
 
Wildlife officers will continue to monitor the area for another 3.5m crocodile that was last observed 1km south of the Cable Beach Surf Club yesterday morning.
 
Crocodile sightings can be reported to the Parks and Wildlife Broome office on 9195 5500 or Kununurra office on 9168 4200.  
 
Media contact: Parks and Wildlife Media 9219 9999
Facebook / Twitter / Instagram: @waparkswildlife

An estuarine (saltwater) crocodile in Lake Kununurra has been humanely destroyed following a four-month operation to try and trap and remove the animal.

Department of Parks and Wildlife officer Mat Byers said the 3.03m male crocodile was located approximately 1km downstream of Crossing Falls boat ramp on Tuesday 4 November.

“Destroying the crocodile was a last resort option,” Mr Byers said.

“We had been trying to trap it for four months since it was first sighted in Lake Kununurra, which is a popular recreation area for water skiers, boaters and swimmers.

“For public safety reasons, once we had a confirmed sighting, we made the decision to dispatch the crocodile with a firearm.”

The department is unaware of any other estuarine crocodiles in the Lake Kununurra crocodile risk mitigation area.

“However, we urge people to always exercise caution as we cannot guarantee the waterway is estuarine crocodile-free.”

Mr Byers asked members of the public to report crocodile sightings.

“If you think you have seen a saltwater crocodile, please attempt to take a photograph from a safe distance and advise your local Parks and Wildlife office immediately.

Estuarine and freshwater crocodiles are protected under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950.

They live in coastal rivers and creek systems, and often occur in open sea and around islands. Estuarine crocodiles also move inland along major rivers, floodplains, billabongs and into freshwater, rivers, creeks and swamps, which are habitats mostly associated with freshwater crocodiles.

Media contact: Parks and Wildlife Media 9219 9999

Facebook: www.facebook.com/dpawwa

Twitter: @WAPARKSWILDLIFE

Tuesday, 26 August 2014 10:05

Saltwater crocodile within Lake Kununurra

The Department of Parks and Wildlife is reminding residents and visitors to be on alert for an estuarine (saltwater) crocodile believed to be in Lake Kununurra.

There have been two confirmed sightings of the 2.5-3m crocodile inside the Lake Kununurra crocodile risk mitigation area in the last month.

East Kimberley district manager Mathew Byers said the department was continuing efforts to locate and remove the animal, but it was proving elusive.

“Warning signs have been placed at the lake’s popular swimming spots and we urge adults, their children and pets to stay out of the water and away from the water’s edge in all areas upstream from Crossing Falls boat ramp,” Mr Byers said.

Estuarine crocodiles are highly mobile animals that can move great distances over land and in the water.

Parks and Wildlife staff have installed a crocodile trap in the vicinity of the last sighting and are conducting regular patrols.

“The second sighting was in a similar area to the first so we are hopeful of being able to track down the crocodile,” Mr Byers said.

“If members of the public see a crocodile please take note of the location and immediately report it to the Parks and Wildlife office in Kununurra on 9168 4200,” Mr Byers said.

Estuarine and freshwater crocodiles are protected under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950.

They live in coastal rivers and creek systems, and often occur in open sea and around islands. Estuarine crocodiles also move inland along major rivers, floodplains, billabongs and into freshwater, rivers, creeks and swamps, which are habitats mostly associated with freshwater crocodiles.

Media contact: Parks and Wildlife Media 9219 9999

Facebook: www.facebook.com/dpawwa

Twitter: @WAPARKSWILDLIFE

 

Tuesday, 10 December 2013 10:30

Croc sighted near Broome Port

 

The Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) is reminding Broome residents and visitors to be aware of crocodiles following a sighting of an estuarine crocodile in the Entrance Point area.

DPaW Officer Darren Stevens said the large crocodile was spotted by members of the public late Sunday afternoon.

The accurate size is unknown as the animal has not yet been sighted by DPaW or Broome Shire rangers but the report suggests the crocodile is large enough to be dangerous.

“People need to be cautious and avoid the beach and waters in areas between the Broome Port and Gantheaume Point,” Mr Stevens said.

Shire Rangers have installed warning signs at Entrance Point, Town Beach and Reddell Beach car parks.

“DPaW and Shire Rangers will continue to monitor the situation.”

Sightings of estuarine crocodiles in the Broome area should be reported to the local DPaW office on 9195 5500.

Estuarine and freshwater crocodiles are protected under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950.

Estuarine crocodiles live in coastal rivers and creek systems and often occur in open sea and around islands. They also move inland along major rivers, floodplain billabongs and into freshwater rivers, creeks and swamps.  

Media contact: DPaW Media 9219 9999

Facebook: www.facebook.com/dpawwa

Twitter: @WAPARKSWILDLIFE

 

 

Tuesday, 03 September 2013 14:49

Croc sighted near Broome Port

The Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) is reminding Broome residents and visitors to be aware of crocodiles following sightings of an estuarine crocodile in the Broome Port, Entrance Point and Reddell Beach areas.

DPaW Officer Darren Stevens said the large crocodile was spotted by members of the public on at least three occasions today and it was last seen in the Reddell Beach area close to shore.

The accurate size is unknown as the animal has not yet been sighted by DPaW or Broome Shire rangers but reports suggest the crocodile is large enough to be dangerous.

“People need to be cautious and avoid the beach and waters in areas between the Broome Port and Gantheaume Point,” Mr Stevens said.

Shire Rangers have installed warning signs at Entrance Point and Reddell Beach car parks, and the Shire of Broome has also closed Reddell Beach.

“DPaW and Shire Rangers, including the DPaW patrol vessel will continue to monitor the situation.”

Sightings of estuarine crocodiles in the Broome area should be reported to the local DPaW office on 9195 5500.

Estuarine and freshwater crocodiles are protected under the Wildlife Conservation Act.

Estuarine crocodiles live in coastal rivers and creek systems and often occur in open sea and around islands. They also move inland along major rivers, floodplain billabongs and into freshwater rivers, creeks and swamps. 

Media contact: DPaW Media 9219 9999

Facebook: www.facebook.com/dpawwa

Twitter: @WAPARKSWILDLIFE