Rehabilitated Carnaby’s cockatoos released into wild

Carnaby's cockatoos are released at The Vines
Carnaby's cockatoos are released at The Vines Karen Smith, DPaW

Twenty endangered Carnaby’s cockatoos successfully rehabilitated after injuries are being released into the wild at two Perth locations.

The birds are being released at The Vines and Kensington by Department of Parks and Wildlife officers and volunteers from the Black Cockatoo Rehabilitation Centre in Martin and Native Animal Rescue in Malaga.

Wildlife officer Karen Smith said the white-tailed black cockatoos had spent about one year at the rehabilitation centres recovering from injuries caused by vehicle strike and other trauma, which had prevented them from flying.

“Each bird is assessed prior to release and we are confident they will make a smooth transition back into the wild,” Ms Smith said.

"To help keep track of them, leg bands and microchips have been placed on the birds to gauge the success of the release.

 

"DNA samples also have been taken to aid monitoring and identification programs for the species.”

 

Ms Smith said the release locations were carefully chosen.

“Birds originating from the northern suburbs are being released at The Vines and birds from the southern and eastern suburbs will be released at Kensington, in close proximity to a roosting site,” she said.

“It is exciting to see these iconic Western Australian birds take flight and hopefully re-join existing wild flocks.”

Carnaby's cockatoos are an endangered species under both Western Australian and Commonwealth legislation.

 

The number of white-tailed black cockatoos has declined in the past 50 years, due to a loss of habitat and a low rate of reproduction. The species is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia and individuals have a lifespan of between 25 and 50 years.

 

Parks and Wildlife have coordinated the release of more than 120 rehabilitated Carnaby’s cockatoos into the wild since 2010.

 

Media contact: Parks and Wildlife Media 9219 9999

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