Notification: Parks and Wildlife Service is part of the new Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA).

State's most popular cadets program celebrates 20th anniversary

  • Youth-based conservation and education program, Bush Rangers WA, celebrates milestone.

  • Bush Rangers has the highest participation of Aboriginal students, female students and students with disability of any Cadets WA program.

Western Australia's biggest cadets program, Bush Rangers WA, has celebrated its 20th year.

Attending the annual Bush Rangers conference today in Perth, Environment Minister Stephen Dawson commended the program that encourages secondary school students to develop practical nature conservation skills and contribute to their local community.

Since its inception in 1998, the program has seen more than 18,500 young people take part, contributing 1.9 million volunteer hours to conservation and community projects.

There are currently 67 cadet units around the State from Kununurra to Esperance, comprising of more than 3200 secondary school students. Students take part in regular camps where they carry out planting, fencing or weeding; as well as adventurous activities including abseiling, swimming with whale sharks, and rock climbing.

Bush Rangers is coordinated by the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions and is part of the broader Cadets WA initiative, supported by the Department of Communities.

 

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Community input sought on Perth Water Precinct Plan

Perth residents are being encouraged to have their say on the future of the Perth Water precinct - the section of the Swan River and its foreshore between the Narrows and Windan bridges.

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions’ Parks and Wildlife Service is running a preliminary survey as part of the consultation process and is asking for community members to participate.Survey - Perth Water Precinct Plan.

 

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Grants awarded to community groups to protect river

  • 17 community groups receive funding in first round of Community Rivercare Grants
  • The not-for-profit volunteer groups will share $300,000 in 2018-19 

The McGowan Labor Government has today announced the first round of grant recipients for its Community Rivercare Program, which will see $900,000 allocated to community groups over three years via the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions.

The funding will help deliver projects including foreshore restoration and riverbank erosion, reduction of nutrient inflows, native waterbird conservation, native fish habitat protection and restocking of native recreational fish species.

 

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  • red necked stint
    The red necked stint migrates from Siberia
    - Photo © B & B Wells/Parks and Wildlife

    Migratory waterbirds include species such as plovers, sandpipers, stints, curlews and snipes.

    These incredible birds make round trip migrations of up to 26,000 kilometres each year between their summer breeding grounds in the northern hemisphere and their feeding areas in the south.These trips are made in several weeks, with brief stops at staging sites along the way to rest and refuel for the next leg of their journey.

    The corridor through which these waterbirds migrate is known as the East Asian - Australasian Flyway.

    • It extends from within the Arctic Circle, through east and south-east Asia, to Australia and New Zealand.
    • Stretching across 22 countries, it is one of eight major waterbird flyways recognised around the globe.

    At least two million migratory waterbirds visit Australia each year during our summer.

    • At least 36 species of migratory waterbirds visit Australian wetlands each year.
      • A further 16 species occasionally visit Australia.
      • Another 15 species—at least 1.1 million birds—permanently live in Australia.
    • In about September each year, hundreds of thousands of migratory waterbirds begin to arrive and inhabit wetlands of Western Australia's north- and south-west, feeding mostly on the invertebrates that live in shallow water in drying wetlands, tidal flats and salt marshes.
    • Common species include the red-necked stint, curlew sandpiper, sharp-tailed sandpiper, bar-tailed godwit and greenshank.

    Conserving migratory waterbirds

    parry lagoon kimb 1 Parry Lagoons Nature Reserve, Kimberley - Photo © M Coote/H Smith.

    Migratory waterbirds and their habitats are internationally protected because:

    • land use activities such as agriculture, mining and urban development can impact on wetlands visited by migratory waterbirds.
    • along their migratory route, the birds stop at many different wetlands. Because disturbance at one site affects the entire network of wetlands used by these birds, it is important to protect wetlands all along the flyway.

    Asia-Pacific Migratory Waterbird Conservation Strategy

    Australia, with other countries, has developed regional strategies to help protect the habitats of migratory waterbirds, the most recent of which is the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership.

    Its goal is to recognise and manage a network of important wetland sites to ensure the long-term conservation of migratory shorebirds along the flyway.

    Nineteen of these important sites are in Australia, four in Western Australia within Ramsar Sites and managed by the department:

      Explore Parks provides visitor information on parks in Western Australia.

    International agreements on migratory waterbird conservation

    Australia is a signatory to three international agreements that protect and recognise the importance of conserving migratory birds and their habitats:

    Species of migratory birds that occur in Australia, Japan, China and the Republic of Korea are listed under the three agreements.

    Related resources:

    • Shorebirds and seabirds of the Pilbara coast and islands

      Shorebirds and seabirds of the Pilbara coast and islands

      The Pilbara coast and islands, including the Exmouth Gulf, provide important refuge for a number of shorebird and seabird species. For migratory shorebirds, sandy spits, sandbars, rocky shores, sandy beaches, salt marshes, intertidal flats and mangroves are important feeding and resting habitat during spring and summer, when the birds escape the harsh winter of their northern hemisphere breeding grounds. 

      pdfShorebirds and seabirds of the Pilbara Coast and islands1.59 MB